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Surgical Needs at the End of the Battle of Mosul: Results from Mosul General Hospital
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Disaster Medicine and Traumatology.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
Capio St Gorans Hosp, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping. Vrinnevi Hosp, Sweden.
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(English)In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose The aim of the study was to analyze the surgical needs of patients seeking emergency care at the Mosul General Hospital in the final phase of the battle of Mosul in northern Iraq between an international military coalition and rebel forces. During the conflict, the International Red Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) supported the hospital with staff and resources. Ceasefire in the conflict was declared at the end of July 2017. Methods Routinely collected hospital data from the ICRC-supported Mosul General Hospital from June 6, 2017, to October 1, 2017 were collected and analyzed retrospectively. All patients with weapon-related injuries as well as all patients with other types of injuries or acute surgical illness were included. Results Some 265 patients were admitted during the study period. Non-weapon-related conditions were more common than weapon-related (55.1%). The most common non-weapon-related condition was appendicitis followed by hernia and soft tissue wounds. Blast/fragment was the most frequent weapon-related injury mechanism followed by gunshot. The most commonly injured body regions were chest and abdomen. Children accounted for 35.3% of all weapon-related injuries. Patients presented at the hospital with weapon-related injuries more than 2 months after the official declaration of ceasefire. A majority of the non-weapon-related, as well as the weapon-related conditions, needed surgery (88.1% and 87.6%, respectively). Few postoperative complications were reported. Conclusions The number of children affected by the fighting seems to be higher in this cohort compared to previous reports. Even several months after the fighting officially ceased, patients with weapon-related injuries were presenting. Everyday illnesses or non-weapon-related injuries dominated. This finding underlines the importance of providing victims of conflicts with surgery for life-threatening conditions, whether weapon related or not.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER.
National Category
Surgery
Research subject
Disaster Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162056DOI: 10.1007/s00268-019-05250-1ISI: 000493623400001PubMedID: 31676974OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-162056DiVA, id: diva2:1371364
Note

Funding Agencies|Linkoping University

Available from: 2019-11-19 Created: 2019-11-19 Last updated: 2019-12-04

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Backström, FredrikBäckström, DeniseAndersson, PeterWladis, Andreas
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Department of Clinical and Experimental MedicineFaculty of Medicine and Health SciencesCenter for Disaster Medicine and TraumatologyDivision of Surgery, Orthopedics and OncologyDepartment of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in NorrköpingDepartment of Surgery in Norrköping
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World Journal of Surgery
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