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Level of Agreement Between Problem Gamblers and Collaterals Reports: A Bayesian Random-Effects Two-Part Model
Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4753-6745
Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Gambling Studies, ISSN 1050-5350, E-ISSN 1573-3602, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 1127-1145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates the level of agreement between problem gamblers and their concerned significant others (CSOs) regarding the amount of money lost when gambling. Reported losses were analyzed from 266 participants (133 dyads) seeking treatment, which included different types of CSO-gambler dyads. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) concerning the money lost when gambling during the last 30 days were calculated based on the timeline followback. In order to model reports that were highly skewed and included zeros, a two-part generalized linear mixed-effects model was used. The results were compared from models assuming either a Gaussian, two-part gamma, or two-part lognormal response distribution. Overall, the results indicated a fair level of agreement, ICC = .57, 95% CI (.48, .64), between the gamblers and their CSOs. The partner CSOs tended to exhibit better agreement than the parent CSOs with regard to the amount of money lost, ICCdiff = .20, 95% CI (.03, .39). The difference became smaller and inconclusive when reports of no losses (zeros) were included, ICCdiff = .16, 95% CI (- .05, .36). A small simulation investigation indicated that the two-part model worked well under assumptions related to this study, and further, that calculating the ICCs under normal assumptions led to incorrect conclusions regarding the level of agreement for skewed reports (such as gambling losses). For gambling losses, the normal assumption is unlikely to hold and ICCs based on this assumption are likely to be highly unreliable.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019. Vol. 35, no 4, p. 1127-1145
Keywords [en]
Gambling; CSO-gambler agreement; Skewed data; Intraclass correlations; Two-part models
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162311DOI: 10.1007/s10899-019-09847-yISI: 000494041700003PubMedID: 30941609Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85071263546OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-162311DiVA, id: diva2:1374078
Note

Funding Agencies|Svenska Spels Independent Research Council [2013-0015]

Available from: 2019-11-28 Created: 2019-11-28 Last updated: 2019-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Andersson, Gerhard

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PsychologyFaculty of Arts and SciencesDepartment of Otorhinolaryngology
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