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Investigating the Double-Deficit Hypothesis in More and Less Transparent Orthographies: A Longitudinal Study from Preschool to Grade 2
Univ Bergen, Norway; Univ Stavanger, Norway.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
Univ Colorado, CO 80309 USA.
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Studies of Reading, ISSN 1088-8438, E-ISSN 1532-799X, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 478-493Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigated the double-deficit hypothesis (DDH) in samples of U.S. (N = 489), Australian (N = 264), and Scandinavian (N = 293) children followed from preschool to grade 2. Children were assigned to double deficit, single deficit and no deficit subtypes in preschool, kindergarten, and grade 1 and compared on reading and spelling in grades 1 and 2. In most analyses, the double deficit subtype scored significantly lower in reading and spelling than the single deficits, a pattern of findings that was identical across samples. Moreover, across countries, RAN deficits showed a stronger effect on reading whereas PA deficits showed stronger effects on spelling. Overall, the results supported the basic premises of the DDH suggesting that the double deficit subtype represents the most impaired readers, and that RAN and PA are separable deficits with different effects on reading and spelling. The results also supported a universal view of literacy development, with similar predictive patterns of DDH subtypes across orthographies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD , 2019. Vol. 23, no 6, p. 478-493
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Pedagogy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162532DOI: 10.1080/10888438.2019.1610410ISI: 000497193200001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-162532DiVA, id: diva2:1376499
Note

Funding Agencies|National Institute of HealthUnited States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA [1 R01 HD38526,2 P50 HD27802]; VetenskapsradetSwedish Research Council [345-2002-3701, PDOKJ028/2006:1]; Norges Forskningsrad [154715/330]; Australian Research CouncilAustralian Research Council [A79906201]

Available from: 2019-12-09 Created: 2019-12-09 Last updated: 2019-12-09

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Citation style
  • apa
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  • de-DE
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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