liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Increased blood-brain barrier permeability is associated with dementia and diabetes but not amyloid pathology or APOE genotype
Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.ORCID iD: katarina.nagga@med.lu.se
Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Neurobiology of Aging, ISSN 0197-4580, E-ISSN 1558-1497, Vol. 51, p. 104-112, article id S0197-4580(16)30304-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction might be an important component of many neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we investigated its role in dementia using large clinical cohorts. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/plasma albumin ratio (Qalb), an indicator of BBB (and blood-CSF barrier) permeability, was measured in a total of 1015 individuals. The ratio was increased in patients with Alzheimer's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies or Parkinson's disease dementia, subcortical vascular dementia, and frontotemporal dementia compared with controls. However, this measure was not changed during preclinical or prodromal Alzheimer's disease and was not associated with amyloid positron emission tomography or APOE genotype. The Qalb was increased in diabetes mellitus and correlated positively with CSF biomarkers of angiogenesis and endothelial dysfunction (vascular endothelial growth factor, intracellular adhesion molecule 1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1). In healthy elderly, high body mass index and waist-hip ratio predicted increased Qalb 20 years later. In summary, BBB permeability is increased in major dementia disorders but does not relate to amyloid pathology or APOE genotype. Instead, BBB impairment may be associated with diabetes and brain microvascular damage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 51, p. 104-112, article id S0197-4580(16)30304-9
Keywords [en]
APOE ε4, Amyloid, Blood-brain barrier, Dementia, Diabetes, Vascular pathology
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162698DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2016.11.017ISI: 000397168600011PubMedID: 28061383Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85007609372OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-162698DiVA, id: diva2:1379246
Available from: 2019-12-16 Created: 2019-12-16 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Nägga, Katarina
In the same journal
Neurobiology of Aging
Neurology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf