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Disparities in cancer screening in people with mental illness across the world versus the general population: prevalence and comparative meta-analysis including 4717 839 people
Univ Padua, Italy; Kings Coll London, England.
Western Sydney Univ, Australia; Univ Manchester, England.
Univ Padua, Italy.
Univ Melbourne, Australia.
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2020 (English)In: Lancet psychiatry, ISSN 2215-0374, E-ISSN 2215-0366, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 52-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Since people with mental illness are more likely to die from cancer, we assessed whether people with mental illness undergo less cancer screening compared with the general population. Methods In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched PubMed and PsycINFO, without a language restriction, and hand-searched the reference lists of induded studies and previous reviews for observational studies from database inception until May 5, 2019. We included all published studies focusing on any type of cancer screening in patients with mental illness; and studies that reported prevalence of cancer screening in patients, or comparative measures between patients and the general population. The primary outcome was odds ratio (OR) of cancer screening in people with mental illness versus the general population. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to assess study quality and I-2 to assess study heterogeneity. This study is registered with PROSPERO, CRD42018114781. Findings 47 publications provided data from 46 samples including 4 717 839 individuals (501559 patients with mental illness, and 4 216 280 controls), of whom 69.85% were women, for screening for breast cancer (k=35; 296 699 individuals with mental illness, 1 023 288 in the general population), cervical cancer (k=29; 295 688 with mental illness, 3 540408 in general population), colorectal cancer (k=12; 153 283 with mental illness, 2 228 966 in general population), lung and gastric cancer (both k=1; 420 with mental illness, none in general population), ovarian cancer (k=1; 37 with mental illness, none in general population), and prostate cancer (k=6; 52 803 with mental illness, 2 038 916 in general population). Median quality of the included studies was high at 7 (IQR 6-8). Screening was significantly less frequent in people with any mental disease compared with the general population for any cancer (k=37; OR 0.76 [95% CI 0.72-0.79]; I-2=98.53% with publication bias of Eggers p value=0.025), breast cancer (k=27; 0.65 [0. 60-0.71]; I-2=97.58% and no publication bias), cervical cancer (k=23; 0.89 [O. 84-0. 95]; I-2 =98.47% and no publication bias), and prostate cancer (k=4; 0.78 [0.70-0.86]; I-2=79.68% and no publication bias), but not for colorectal cancer (k=8; 1.02 [0.90-1.15]; I-2=97.84% and no publication bias). Interpretation Despite the increased mortality from cancer in people with mental illness, this population receives less cancer screening compared with that of the general population. Specific approaches should be developed to assist people with mental illness to undergo appropriate cancer screening, especially women with schizophrenia. Copyright (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD , 2020. Vol. 7, no 1, p. 52-63
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162936DOI: 10.1016/S2215-0366(19)30414-6ISI: 000503168400029OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-162936DiVA, id: diva2:1382371
Note

Funding Agencies|Health Education England [ICA-CL-2017-03-001]; National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) [ICA-CL-2017-03-001]; NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust; Maudsley Charity, Kings College London; NIHR South London Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care funding

Available from: 2020-01-02 Created: 2020-01-02 Last updated: 2020-01-02

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