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Visual and auditory priming in Swedish poor readers: a double dissociation
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
1998 (English)In: Dyslexia, ISSN 1076-9242, Vol. 4, no 1, 16-29 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Schacter et al. (1990) found support for a functional dissociation between visual and auditory priming effects in a letter-by-letter reader. Their conclusions were based on the perceptual representation systems framework, suggesting that visual priming is mediated by a visual word form system separate from an auditory word form system responsible for auditory priming. This article focuses on visual and auditory priming effects exhibited by poor readers with phonological or surface subtypes of reading disability. The phonological type of reading disability was defined as an impairment in phonological word decoding, whereas the surface type of reading disability was defined as an impairment in orthographic word decoding. The results demonstrated a double dissociation, such that poor readers with a surface type of reading disability produced more auditory than visual priming, whereas poor readers with a phonological type of reading disability showed more visual than auditory priming. The majority of children with reading disabilities showed weaknesses in both orthographic and phonological word decoding and, importantly, low levels of priming effects for both visually and auditorily presented materials. Finally, age-matched normal readers showed significant priming effects for both visual and auditory presented words. These findings support the assumption that both orthographic and phonological skills can be simultaneously impaired and that a dual-route model for the acquisition of word decoding skills might be the most appropriate framework to describe different subtypes of reading disabilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley InterScience , 1998. Vol. 4, no 1, 16-29 p.
Keyword [en]
Poor readers, subtypes of reading disabilities, auditory and visual priming, dissociations
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16554DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1099-0909(199803)4:1<16::AID-DYS97>3.0.CO;2-8OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-16554DiVA: diva2:158368
Available from: 2009-02-02 Created: 2009-02-02 Last updated: 2009-06-03Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Varieties of reading disability: Phonological and orthographic word decoding deficits and implications for interventions
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Varieties of reading disability: Phonological and orthographic word decoding deficits and implications for interventions
2000 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The general aim of this thesis was to examine variations in the word decoding skills of reading disabled children. These variations were related to possible cognitive, developmental, and environmental causes of reading disability. Possible implications for educational interventions were also analysed.

The thesis critically examines the inclusion of the concept of intelligence in the definition of developmental dyslexia. It is suggested that variations in word decoding skills should offer a more solid basis for a study of varieties of reading disability. The empirical studies showed that a) in young children there was a shift from phonological to orthographic word decoding; b) phonological type children (weak in phonological decoding) were characterised by specific phonological deficits; c) surface type children (weak in orthographic decoding) showed more global cognitive deficits suggesting a general developmental delay; d) surface type children showed impaired visual implicit memory for words, which might be associated with limited print exposure; e) an improvement in phonological awareness only transferred to an improved text reading ability for some reading disabled children; f) children who did not benefit from a phonological intervention seemed to rely on orthographic word decoding in text reading.

Thus, the thesis suggests that variations in phonological and orthographic word decoding skills offer a useful basis for the study of varieties of reading disability and that educational interventions should pay regard to what the child is already attempting to do when reading.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2000. 61 p.
Series
Studies from the Swedish Institute for Disability Research, ISSN 1650-1128 ; 1
Keyword
Reading disability, dyslexia, word decoding, individual differences
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16558 (URN)91-7219-867-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2000-11-17, Eklundska salen, Campus Valla, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:00 (English)
Supervisors
Note
On the day of the defence date the status of article IV was: Manuscript.Available from: 2009-02-02 Created: 2009-02-02 Last updated: 2012-01-24Bibliographically approved

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Samuelsson, StefanGustafson, StefanRönnberg, Jerker

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