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Recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis: A 1-year observational study of correlations between health‐related quality of life and clinical/laboratory data
Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0153-9249
Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
2005 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, Vol. 37, no 3, 159-165 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To analyse correlations within and between clinical/laboratory assessments and health-related quality of life variables for recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis at the time of diagnosis and 12 months later.

Methods: A total of 297 patients with recent-onset (?12 months) rheumatoid arthritis were included at diagnosis and followed up for 12 months. Clinical/laboratory assessment was performed by erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, 28-joint count of tender/swollen joints, physician's global assessment, grip force, grip ability, functional impairment and walking speed. The self-reported health-related quality of life included symptoms (pain, morning stiffness), patients estimated general health, Health Assessment Questionnaire and SF-36.

Results: All tested variables improved within 6 months of diagnosis and then remained stable but still affected at the 12-month follow-up. Multivariate correlations between clinical/laboratory variables and health-related quality of life were weak. At inclusion, clinical/laboratory assessments explained 18% of health-related quality of life at the same time-point and predicted 7% of the variation in health-related quality of life after 12 months.

Conclusion: The time-course followed similar patterns for most variables, but only a small part of the variation in health-related quality of life was explained or predicted by the clinical/laboratory variables. This implies that health-related quality of life adds important information to clinical/laboratory assessments in clinical practice and should be considered in goal setting together with clinical/laboratory assessment in order to optimize healthcare and outcome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis , 2005. Vol. 37, no 3, 159-165 p.
Keyword [en]
Outcome, early rheumatoid arthritis, health‐related quality of life, HAQ, SF‐36, grip force, walking speed
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16666DOI: 10.1080/16501970410023344OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-16666DiVA: diva2:159748
Available from: 2009-02-10 Created: 2009-02-10 Last updated: 2015-08-31Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Disease and disability in early rheumatoid arthritis: A 3-year follow-up of women and men in the Swedish TIRA project
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disease and disability in early rheumatoid arthritis: A 3-year follow-up of women and men in the Swedish TIRA project
2005 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease, which often leads to disability. This study is based on three years’ follow-up data generated by patients included during 27 months 1996-1998 in a Swedish multi-centre project named ‘early interventions in rheumatoid arthritis’ (TIRA). Disease activity, disability and health-related quality of life (HRQL) were assessed by clinical and laboratory analyses, and self-reported estimations. The course during three years and relations between clinical/laboratory assessments versus HRQL were studied separately in women and men. The relation between grip force and self-reported activity limitations was analysed, and finally the use and effects of assistive devices were evaluated separately for women and men.

Clinical/laboratory assessments and self-reported HRQL were substantially affected at the time for diagnosis, but the relations between clinical/laboratory assessments and self-reported HRQL were weak. Among the studied clinical/laboratory variables used here grip force, walking speed, and possibly physician’s global assessment of disease activity showed most stable relationships with the HRQL. However, the time course of clinical/laboratory and selfreported HRQL measurements followed similar patterns. Thus, most variables had improved considerably at the 3- and 6-months’ follow-ups and then remained stable but still affected over three years. An exception was the SF-36 scale ‘general health’, which was reduced to the same extent during the whole study period.

As judged by the ‘Health Assessment Questionnaire’ (HAQ) and ‘Evaluation of Daily Activities Questionnaire’ (EDAQ), activity limitations were more pronounced in women than in men. By contrast, as reflected by ‘Signals of Functional Impairment’ (SOFI), men had slightly more affected function of the hands and upper extremities. Women with RA had about half of the grip force compared to male patients, which is in accordance with the differences between healthy women and men. At diagnosis, the grip force was reduced to about 30% in RA patients compared to healthy referents of the same sex. Already three months later, it improved but was still reduced to about 50% of healthy referents.

Further analyses revealed that HAQ and EDAQ were strongly related to grip force independently of sex. Grip force below 114 N was found to be associated with substantial activity limitation in women as well as in men. Assistive devices (ADs) were more frequently used by women (78%) than men (54%), and were found to reduce activity limitations. The subgroups of women and men using ADs were comparable regarding disease activity and disability, and were generally more affected regarding activity limitations, compared to the subgroups that did not use ADs. Within the subgroups of patients using ADs, women and men had equivalent HAQ status and ADs were reported to reduce activity limitations in both women and men with recent-onset RA.

The weak relation between clinical/laboratory assessments and self-reported HRQL supports the results by others. By means of HAQ, more pronounced activity limitations have been reported previously in women with RA, compared to male patients. In the present study, similar differences were recorded by EDAQ. Further analyses showed that reduced grip force was closely related to activity limitations independently of sex. This offers a new explanation to poor female outcome recorded by HAQ.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2005. 53 p.
Series
Studies from the Swedish Institute for Disability Research, ISSN 1650-1128 ; 16Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 906
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16676 (URN)91-85299-16-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2005-09-02, Berzeliussalen, Campus US, Linköpings Universitet, Linköping, 13:00 (Swedish)
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Available from: 2009-02-10 Created: 2009-02-10 Last updated: 2015-08-31Bibliographically approved

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Thyberg, IngridSkogh, ThomasHass, Ursula A. M.Gerdle, Björn

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Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
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