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Building Life-World Connections during School Booktalk
Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2822-4789
Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
2004 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, Vol. 48, no 5, 511-528 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In criticism of children’s literature, notions of ‘fantasy’ and ‘realism’ are pivotal. In school ‘booktalk’ conversations, pupils referred to what is ‘real’ in three different ways: (i) by referring to feelings or semblance of ‘real’ life, (ii) by invoking shared facts, and (iii) by making references to personal experiences. In cases when teachers or pupils initiated so-called text-to-life or real-world connections, two types of dilemmas occurred. First, engagement was at times bought at the cost of quite literal reader responses. At other times, engagement was accomplished at the price of intrusiveness. There was thus, a delicate balance between life-world references, on the one hand, and literal readings or intrusion, on the other. Moreover, students sometimes resisted life-world probing, but volunteered privileged information about their parents, displaying different notions from teachers about legitimate information in a school context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge , 2004. Vol. 48, no 5, 511-528 p.
Keyword [en]
bookclubs, discourse analysis, reader response, realism
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-10686DOI: 10.1080/003138042000272159OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-10686DiVA: diva2:17386
Note

Original publication: Katarina Eriksson & Karin Aronsson, Building Life-World Connections during School Booktalk, 2004, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, (48), 5, 511-528. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/003138042000272159 Copyright: Taylor and Francis (Routledge group), http://www.routledge.com/.

The original title of this article was: Realism and Intertextuality in School Booktalk.

Available from: 2008-01-30 Created: 2008-01-30 Last updated: 2014-09-12
In thesis
1. Life and Fiction: On intertextuality in pupils’ booktalk
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life and Fiction: On intertextuality in pupils’ booktalk
2002 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This study examines booktalk, that is, teacher-led group discussions about books for children in a Swedish school. The empirical data comprise 24 hours of videorecorded booktalk in grades 4–7. In total, 40 children (aged 10–14 years) were recorded during 24 sessions. The present approach diverges from previous readerresponse studies in that it draws on authentic data, and in that it examines talk at a micro level, applying an approach from discursive psychology. By focusing on authentic book discussions, the study contributes to the development of readerresponse methods.

All eight books applied in the booktalk sessions involved some type of  existential issue: freedom, separation, loyalty, and mortal danger (Chapter 4). Yet, such issues were rarely discussed. An important task of the present thesis was to understand why such issues did not materialise, that is, what did not take place. In Chapter 5, a series of booktalk dilemmas were identified. The booktalk sessions were generally lively and informal. Yet, booktalk as such was often transformed into other local educational projects; e.g. time scheduling, vocabulary lessons or reading aloud exercises.

Gender was invoked in all booktalk sessions (Chapter 6). In line with predictions from reader-response theory, progressive texts were, at times, discussed in gender stereotypical ways. The findings also revealed a generational pattern in that the pupils discussed fictive children in less traditional ways than adult characters.

The interface between texts and life was invoked in all booktalk sessions (Chapter 7). There was, again, a generational pattern in that children entertained ideas other than those of their teachers concerning legitimate topics in a school context. Also, the discussions revealed a problem of balance between pupils’ privacy, on the one hand, and engaging discussions on texts and life, on the other.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2002. 77 + references and appendicies A-C p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Arts and Science, ISSN 0282-9800 ; 251
Keyword
Reader response, children’s literature, discourse analysis, booktalk, gender, barn och böcker, bokprat, diskursanalys, intertextualitet, litteraturpedagogik i skolan
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-15146 (URN)91-7373-299-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2002-05-08, Hörsalen, Stadsbiblioteket, Östgötagatan 5, 581 19 Linköping, Linköping, 13:15 (English)
Supervisors
Available from: 2008-10-17 Created: 2008-10-17 Last updated: 2014-09-12Bibliographically approved

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Eriksson (Barajas), KatarinaAronsson, Karin

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