liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Pelvic Girdle Pain and Lumbar Pain in Pregnancy: A Cohort Study of the Consequences in terms of Health and Functioning
Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
2006 (English)In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, Vol. 31, no 5, E149-E155 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study Design A cohort study in pregnancy.

Objectives To differentiate between pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain (PPGP) and lumbar pain, and to study the prevalence of each syndrome and its consequences in terms of pain, functioning, and health.

Summary of Background Data When studying prevalence, etiology, and consequences, differentiation between PPGP and lumbar pain is important, and, to our knowledge, its consequences for functioning and health during pregnancy have not previously been studied.

Methods All women answered questionnaires (demographic data, EuroQol). Women with lumbopelvic pain completed the Oswestry Disability Index, pain intensity measures, in addition to undergoing a mechanical assessment of the lumbar spine, pain provocation tests, and active straight leg raising test.

Results Of 313 women, 194 had lumbopelvic pain. The PPGP subgroup comprised 54% of those women with lumbopelvic pain, lumbar pain 17%, and combined PPGP and lumbar pain 29%. Women having both PPGP and lumbar pain reported the highest consequences in terms of health and functioning.

Conclusions Pain intensity, disability, and health measurements differentiate subgroups of lumbopelvic pain in pregnancy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 31, no 5, E149-E155 p.
Keyword [en]
pelvic girdle pain, lumbar pain, pregnancy, health, functioning
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12990DOI: 10.1097/01.brs.0000201259.63363.e1OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-12990DiVA: diva2:17598
Available from: 2008-03-06 Created: 2008-03-06 Last updated: 2009-05-15
In thesis
1. Pelvic Girdle Pain and Lumbar Pain in relation to pregnancy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pelvic Girdle Pain and Lumbar Pain in relation to pregnancy
2007 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The prevalence of low back pain (LBP) is higher in pregnant women compared to women of the same age in a general population. Pregnancy-related LBP persists 6 years after pregnancy in 16% of women. Consequently, pregnancy represents a specific risk for LBP and persistent LBP. Pregnancy-related LBP is usually studied as a single entity, however, only one subgroup of LBP, i.e. pelvic girdle pain (PGP), seems to be associated with pregnancy. Accordingly, possible differences in subgroups of patients with LBP are unknown.

The aims of this thesis were the following: 1) to describe the prevalence of clinically classified subgroups of women with LBP in a cohort (no LBP, lumbar pain, PGP, and combined pain (PGP and lumbar pain)) during pregnancy and postpartum, and 2) to determine if there was a disparity in the course, health-related quality of life (HRQL), pain intensity, disability, depressive symptoms, or muscle function in subgroups of the cohort, and 3) to identify predictors for having persistent pregnancy-related PGP postpartum.

Consecutively-enrolled pregnant women were classified into LBP subgroups by mechanical assessment of the lumbar spine, pelvic pain provocation tests, standard history, and pain drawings. All women answered questionnaires (background data, EQ-5D). Women with LBP completed the Oswestry Disability Index and pain measures. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was used to evaluate depressive symptoms at 3 months postpartum (cut-off ≥10). Trunk muscle endurance, hip muscle strength, and gait speed were investigated. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify predictors from self-reports and clinical examination.

At the 12-18 gestational week evaluation, 118/308 (38%) women had no LBP, 33 (11%) had lumbar pain, 101 (33%) had PGP, and 56 (18%) had combined pain. Three months postpartum, 183/272 (67%) women had no LBP, 29 (11%) had lumbar pain, 46 (17%) had PGP, and 14 (5%) had combined pain. Pregnant women with combined pain were most affected in terms of HRQL, pain intensity, and disability. Depressive symptoms were three times more prevalent in women with LBP (27/87, 31%) than in women without LBP (17/180, 9%). Women with PGP and/or combined pain had lower values for trunk muscle endurance, hip extensor strength and gait speed compared to women without LBP. Postpartum, 16-20% of the women had persistent combined pain or PGP, whereas 1/29 had lumbar pain. Predictors for persistent PGP or combined pain were work dissatisfaction, older age, combined pain in early pregnancy, and low endurance of the back flexors.

In conclusion, women with combined pain were identified to be a target group since they had the lowest recovery rate and since the classification of combined pain was found to be a predictor for persistent PGP or combined pain postpartum. The hypothesis of an association between muscle dysfunction and PGP was strengthened. Based on the finding of high comorbidity of postpartum depressive symptoms and LBP, it seems important to screen for and consider treatment strategies for both symptoms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, 2007
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 998
Keyword
Pelvic girdle pain, lumbar pain, pregnancy, health, functioning, postpartum depressive symptoms; low back pain; muscle function; gait; pregnancy-related; low back pain; course; predictors; recovery; persistent; muscle endurance
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-11156 (URN)978-91-85715-14-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2007-05-25, Berzeliussalen, Universitetssjukhuset, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2008-03-06 Created: 2008-03-06 Last updated: 2009-08-22

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textLink to Ph.D. thesis

Authority records BETA

Gutke, AnnelieÖberg, Birgitta

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Gutke, AnnelieÖberg, Birgitta
By organisation
PhysiotherapyFaculty of Health Sciences
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 695 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf