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Lifestyle changes are burdensome with my body broken by pain and obesity: patients perspectives after pain rehabilitation
Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4166-7269
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2023 (English)In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 840Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Despite the existing evidence regarding the interrelated relationship between pain and obesity, knowledge about patients perspectives of this relationship is scarce, especially from patients with chronic pain and obesity after completing Interdisciplinary Pain Rehabilitation Program (IPRP). Aims This qualitative study expands the understanding of patients perspectives on how chronic pain and obesity influence each other and how the two conditions affect the ability to make lifestyle changes. Method A purposive sample of patients with Body Mass Index (BMI) >= 30 kg/m(2) and who had completed an IPRP were recruited for individual semi-structured interviews. The transcribed interviews were analysed using latent content analysis and a pattern of theme and categories was constructed based on the participants perspectives. Results Sixteen patients (aged 28-63 years, 11 female, BMI 30-43 kg/m(2)) shared their experiences of chronic pain, obesity and lifestyle changes after IPRP. The analysis revealed one overall theme (lifestyle changes are burdensome with a body broken by both pain and obesity) and four categories (pain disturbing days and nights worsens weight control, pain-related stress makes lifestyle changes harder, a painful and obese body intertwined with negative emotions and the overlooked impact of obesity on chronic pain). Most participants perceived that their pain negatively impacted their obesity, but they were uncertain whether their obesity negatively impacted their pain. Nevertheless, the participants desired and struggled to make lifestyle changes. Conclusion After IPRP, patients with chronic pain and obesity perceived difficulties with self-management and struggles with lifestyle changes. They experienced a combined burden of the two conditions. Their perspective on the unilateral relationship between pain and obesity differed from the existing evidence. Future tailored IPRPs should integrate nutritional interventions and address the knowledge gaps as well.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC , 2023. Vol. 24, no 1, article id 840
Keywords [en]
Chronic pain; Obesity; Lifestyle; Interdisciplinary Pain Rehabilitation Program (IPRP); Rehabilitation
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-199114DOI: 10.1186/s12891-023-06961-2ISI: 001088901500001PubMedID: 37880642OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-199114DiVA, id: diva2:1811543
Note

Funding Agencies|The authors thank all the patients who considered and shared their personal experiences. We would like to give our thanks to research assistants Annika Kallin, Pernilla Olsson, Frida Strand, and Lena Connysson for participant coordination, transcription, and extraction of the quantitative data from SQRP.

Available from: 2023-11-13 Created: 2023-11-13 Last updated: 2024-05-24

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Johansson, Maria M.

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