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Cognitive correlates of visual speech understanding in hearing impaired individuals
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
2001 (English)In: Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, ISSN 1081-4159, Vol. 6, no 2, 103-116 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined the extent to which different measures ofspeechreading performance correlated with particular cognitiveabilities in a population of hearing-impaired people. Althoughthe three speechreading tasks (isolated word identification,sentence comprehension, and text tracking) were highly intercorrelated,they tapped different cognitive skills. In this population,younger participants were better speechreaders, and, when agewas taken into account, speech tracking correlated primarilywith (written) lexical decision speed. In contrast, speechreadingfor sentence comprehension correlated most strongly with performanceon a phonological processing task (written pseudohomophone detection)but also on a span measure that may have utilized visual, nonverbalmemory for letters. We discuss the implications of this pattern.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. Vol. 6, no 2, 103-116 p.
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13499DOI: 10.1093/deafed/6.2.103OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-13499DiVA: diva2:20868
Available from: 2002-10-01 Created: 2002-10-01 Last updated: 2016-03-14
In thesis
1. Cognitive deafness: The deterioration of phonological representations in adults with an acquired severe hearing loss and its implications for speech understanding
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive deafness: The deterioration of phonological representations in adults with an acquired severe hearing loss and its implications for speech understanding
2001 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present thesis was to examine possible cognitive consequences of acquired hearing loss and the possible impact of these cognitive consequences on the ability to process spoken language presented through visual speechreading or through a cochlear implant.

The main findings of the present thesis can be summarised in the following conclusions: (a) The phonological processing capabilities of individuals who have acquired a severe hearing loss or deafness deteriorate progressively as a function of number of years with a complete or partial auditory deprivation. (b) The observed phonological deterioration is restricted to certain aspects of the phonological system. Specifically, the phonological representations of words in the mental lexicon are of less good quality, whereas the phonological system in verbal working memory is preserved. (c) The deterioration of the phonological representations has a negative effect on the individual's ability to process speech, either presented visually (i.e., speechreading) or through a cochlear implant, as it may impair word recognition processes which involve activation of and discrimination between the phonological representations in the lexicon. (d) Thus, the present research describes an acquired cognitive disability not previously documented in the literature, and contributes to the context of other populations with phonological disabilities by showing that a complete or partial deprivation of auditory speech stimulation in adulthood can give rise to a phonological disability. (e) From a clinical point of view, the results from the present thesis suggest that early cochlear implantation after the onset of an acquired severe hearing loss is an important objective in order to reach a high level of speech understanding with the implant.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2001. 83 p.
Series
Studies from the Swedish Institute for Disability Research, ISSN 1650-1128 ; 3
Keyword
Acquired hearing loss, phonological processsing, cochlear implants, speechreading
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-4983 (URN)91-7373-029-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2001-06-15, Eklundska salen, Hus I, Campus Valla, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:00 (English)
Supervisors
Available from: 2002-10-01 Created: 2002-10-01 Last updated: 2014-08-28Bibliographically approved

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Andersson, UlfLyxnell, BjörnRönnberg, Jerker

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Department of Behavioural Sciences and LearningFaculty of Arts and SciencesDepartment of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHLThe Swedish Institute for Disability ResearchDisability Research
Social Sciences

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