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Increased CSF homocysteine in pathological gamblers compared with healthy controls
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
2009 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction, ISSN 1557-1874, E-ISSN 1557-1882, Vol. 7, no 1, 168-176 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Neurocognitive disturbances suggesting a frontal lobe dysfunction have been observed in pathological gamblers and alcohol dependents. Given that a high homocysteine level has been suggested to be a mediating factor in alcohol-related cognitive decline, we have determined homocysteine and cobalamine in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from 11 pathological male gamblers and 11 healthy male controls. Compared with healthy controls, pathological gamblers displayed higher CSF levels of homocysteine while the opposite was the case with CSF cobalamine. Smoking decreased the levels of homocysteine while the concentrations of cobalamine were increased. Homocysteine is a sulphur-containing amino acid exerting cytotoxic effects in living cells. The metabolism of homocysteine to methionine is mediated by cobalamine and folate. Human studies suggest that homocysteine plays a role in brain damage and cognitive and memory decline. The relationship between pathological gambling, homocysteine, cobalamine, folate (not determined in the study) and cognitive processing warrants further investigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2009. Vol. 7, no 1, 168-176 p.
Keyword [en]
Cobalamine; CSF; Homocysteine; Pathological gambling
National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-18856DOI: 10.1007/s11469-008-9172-2OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-18856DiVA: diva2:221921
Available from: 2009-06-05 Created: 2009-06-05 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved

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Nordin, ConnySjödin, Ingemar

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