liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
New mechanical device for effective removal of skin tags in routine health care
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
2009 (English)In: Dermatologi Online, ISSN 1087-2108, E-ISSN 1087-2108, Vol. 15, no 2, 9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Skin tags (acrochordons) are exceedingly common benign skin lesions. A novel medical device in the form of a flat adhesive patch applies pressure to the base of a skin tag, leading to its removal within 3-6 days. The device was used in a clinical trial to treat and remove skin tags of the neck, upper torso, and axillae in volunteers. In this study, a total of 177 skin tags were treated in 32 individuals. One hundred seventy-two lesions fulfilled intention to treat (ITT) criteria. A majority of ITT lesions (90%) reached final assessment. Successful outcome was highest (90%) for lesions up to 1 mm in base. For lesions up to 2 mm, the rate of successful outcome was 76 percent. The desired outcome was seen in 65 percent of all ITT lesions. The cosmetic outcome after removal was excellent. Discomfort was assessed as minimal during all stages of the procedure. Analysis of data on blood flow in the skin tags during the treatment showed that the outcome was influenced by whether a decrease in blood flow was achieved immediately after application and at 2-3 days, but that the degree of occlusion was not critical. The results of this study illustrate that the device presents a new option for the management of unmet needs in the treatment of skin tags.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of California , 2009. Vol. 15, no 2, 9
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-18884PubMedID: 19336026OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-18884DiVA: diva2:222087
Available from: 2009-06-05 Created: 2009-06-05 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

PubMedLink to publication

Authority records BETA

Fredriksson, CamillaIlias, MichailAnderson, Chris

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Fredriksson, CamillaIlias, MichailAnderson, Chris
By organisation
Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and BurnsFaculty of Health SciencesBiomedical InstrumentationThe Institute of TechnologyDermatology and VenerologyDepartment of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland
In the same journal
Dermatologi Online
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 610 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf