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Therapy with GAD in diabetes
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
2009 (English)In: Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews, ISSN 1520-7552, E-ISSN 1520-7560, Vol. 25, no 4, 307-315 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is of great importance for the neurotransmission in the central nervous system, and therefore of interest for treatment of pain and neurological disease. However, it is also released in pancreas although its role is not quite clear. GAD is a major auto-antigen in the process leading to type 1 diabetes with both a clear cell-mediated immune response to GAD and auto-antibodies to GAD (GADA), which call be used as a predictor of diabetes. Administration of the isoform GAD65 can prevent autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and the subsequent need for exogenous insulin replacement. In Phase I and II studies an alum-formulated vaccine (Diamyd) has shown to be safe, and in a dose-finding study in Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA) patients 20-mu g was given subcutaneously one month apart indicating preservation of residual insulin secretion. A double-blind randomized Phase II trial in 70 patients (10-18 years old) with recent-onset type 1 diabetes showed significant preservation of residual insulin secretion and a GAD-specific immune response, both humoral and cell-mediated, but no treatment-related adverse events. With this promising background further studies are on their way, both intervention in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetic patients, and trials to prevent the disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2009. Vol. 25, no 4, 307-315 p.
Keyword [en]
type 1 diabetes, children, autoimmune process, GAD, immune intervention
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-19141DOI: 10.1002/dmrr.941ISI: 000266347200003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-19141DiVA: diva2:223401
Available from: 2009-06-12 Created: 2009-06-12 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved

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Ludvigsson, Johnny

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