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Gene Expression Analysis of Adipogenic, Chondrogenic and Osteogenic Induced Human Dermal Fibroblasts
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Department of Surgery, Section of Plastic Surgery and Burn Centre, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The use of adult stem cells in tissue engineering applications is a promising alternativewhen the possibility of acquiring autologous cells for transplantation is limited. Even so, theadult stem cell populations identified up to this point are far from optimal in aspects ofharvest and culture expansion. With the recent suggestion of stem cell plasticity inherent inhuman dermal fibroblasts, a new plausible candidate for use as cell source in tissuereconstruction has emerged. Fibroblast cultures can be induced to differentiate towardsadipocyte, chondrocyte and osteoblast-like cells in vitro, by the use of induction media. Thepresent works utilizes Affymetrix full expression micro array to identify if genes commonlyexpressed in stem cells differentiating towards the above-mentioned lineages also areexpressed in induced fibroblasts. Several genes important for differentiation andmaintenance of an adipose, cartilage or bone phenotype were found up-regulated in theinduced cultures. The results presented here provide further evidence for the plasticity ofhuman dermal fibroblasts, and their possible use in tissue engineering and reconstructivesurgery.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-19715OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-19715DiVA: diva2:227692
Available from: 2009-07-16 Created: 2009-07-16 Last updated: 2014-06-04Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Human Dermal Fibroblasts in Tissue Engineering
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human Dermal Fibroblasts in Tissue Engineering
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The loss or failure of tissues and/or organs is one of the most frequent problems in modern healthcare. The field of tissue engineering applies the principles of biology and engineering in order to develop functional substitutes for damaged tissues. Tissue engineering contains elements of medicine, material science and engineering with major components in focus being cells, biomaterials and soluble factors. All three components may be required for the development of clinical treatments.

The usage of autologous tissue specific cells for clinical treatment is often not feasible due to poor growth kinetics or unstable phenotypes of the cells. Furthermore, lack of availability of healthy tissue that can be biopsied is a major problem in many applications. One approach to overcome this problem is to use adult stem cells which have the capacity to give rise to several different cell types. Although promising, adult stem cells have major impediments for use in several tissue engineering applications. The difficulties associated with harvest, culture and storage render problems in the development of clinically relevant procedures.

During the last years, the inherent plasticity of differentiated somatic cells has been demonstrated. One of the easiest human cell types to obtain, expand and store is the dermal fibroblast. Recent reports indicate that dermal fibroblasts can be induced to differentiate towards several distinct mesenchymal lineages in vitro.

The main aim of this thesis was to investigate the inherent stem cell plasticity of human dermal fibroblasts and explore their possible usefulness in tissue engineering applications. The papers included in this thesis employ routine and immunohistochemical staining, enzyme activity assay, analysis of low density lipoprotein incorporation, capillary-like network formation assay and full expression micro array analysis.

Fibroblasts were shown to differentiate towards adipocyte, chondrocyte, endothelial and osteoblast-like cell types in vitro. The differentiation from fibroblasts to myofibroblasts in burn scar tissue upon stimulation by mechanical tension was also demonstrated. Adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic induced fibroblasts display the upregulation of several genes associated with adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteoblasts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2009. 56 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1133
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-19716 (URN)978-91-7393-618-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-08-27, Berzeliussalen, Campus US, Linköpings Universitet, Linköping, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2009-07-16 Created: 2009-07-16 Last updated: 2009-09-15Bibliographically approved

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Junker, JohanRakar, JonathanJohnson, HansKratz, Gunnar

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Cell BiologyFaculty of Health SciencesDivision of Clinical SciencesDepartment of Hand and Plastic Surgery
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