liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Perception of the acoustic environment and neuroimaging findings: a report of six cases with a history of closed head injury
Orebro University Hospital.
Orebro University Hospital.
Orebro University Hospital.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
Show others and affiliations
2009 (English)In: ACTA OTO-LARYNGOLOGICA, ISSN 0001-6489, Vol. 129, no 7, 801-808 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Conclusion: The main finding was the relation between difficulty in determining the direction of movement of a sound source and frontal lesions and poor working memory. Poor correspondence in some cases between functional findings and imaging findings can be due to the possibility of axonal degeneration as well as plastic reorganization. Objective: The purpose of the present investigation of six cases was to identify auditory, cognitive and neuroimaging long-term sequelae of closed head injury (CHI) with particular focus on environmental sound recognition and moving sound sources. Subjects and methods: Six subjects who had experienced CHI were investigated with auditory tests. Four subjects also completed cognitive testing. CT and MRI were performed. Results: There was a large individual variability of the test results with respect to morphological findings. In five cases with central auditory processing disorders morphological brain damage was demonstrated. Two cases with shortcomings on cognitive testing and with frontal brain lesions demonstrated problems in determining the direction of movement of a sound source. The results may indicate that basal frontal lobe structures play a role in following and determining the direction of movement of a sound source. Two cases had problems with environmental sound recognition; in one left temporal brain lesions were demonstrated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 129, no 7, 801-808 p.
Keyword [en]
Sound localization, moving sound source, closed head injury, fracture, brain contusion, audiometry, hearing impairment, central auditory test, cognition, AET, DT scan, MRI
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-19913DOI: 10.1080/00016480802419099OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-19913DiVA: diva2:231642
Available from: 2009-08-14 Created: 2009-08-14 Last updated: 2009-08-14

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Lyxell, Björn

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lyxell, Björn
By organisation
Department of Behavioural Sciences and LearningFaculty of Arts and SciencesDepartment of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 110 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf