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Psychosocial status and health related quality of life in relation to the metabolic syndrome in a Swedish middle-aged population
Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
2009 (English)In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR NURSING, ISSN 1474-5151, Vol. 8, no 3, 207-215 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The Metabolic Syndrome (MS) is a combination of risk factors related to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Psychosocial factors and stress have been suggested to be important determinants. Aim: To analyse how psychosocial factors, perceived stress and health related quality of life are related to MS, and assess if observed associations are dependent of life-style. Methods: A cross-sectional study of a random sample of 502 men and 505 women aged 45-69, front southeast Sweden, including fasting blood samples, blood pressure, anthropometrics, self-reported data of life-style, psychosocial status and health related quality of life (SF-36). Linear regression models were adjusted for age and, in a second step, also for life-style. Results: Men and women with MS reported lower levels of physical activity, lower scores on physical and social dimensions of SF-36, and women with MS reported stronger effect of social change compared to those without MS (p andlt; 0.05), but we found no differences for mental health or perceived stress. The major part of observed associations was lost after adjustment for effects of life-style. Conclusion: Our data speak against a direct effect of social stress on MS via psychological strain but suggest an indirect pathway via a sedentary life-style.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 8, no 3, 207-215 p.
Keyword [en]
Metabolic syndrome, Psychosocial, Stress, Life-style, Health related quality of life
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-20343DOI: 10.1016/j.ejcnurse.2009.01.004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-20343DiVA: diva2:234043
Available from: 2009-09-04 Created: 2009-09-04 Last updated: 2009-09-04

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Hollman Frisman, GunillaKristenson, Margareta

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