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Blood flow changes in the trapezius muscle and overlying skin following transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation
Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
2007 (English)In: Physical Therapy, ISSN 0031-9023, E-ISSN 1538-6724, Vol. 87, no 8, 1047-1055 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and Purpose: Various researchers have studied the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on hemodynamics. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of TENS on local blood flow in the trapezius muscle and overlying skin.

Subjects: Thirty-three women who were healthy, aged 25 to 55 years, were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 3 different modes of TENS.

Methods: Skin and muscle blood flow were monitored noninvasively using a new application of photoplethysmography for 15 minutes of TENS applied at high frequency (80 Hz) and sensory-level intensity and at low frequency (2 Hz) and motor-level intensity and for 15 minutes after stimulation. Subliminal 80-Hz TENS was used as a control. Blood flow was monitored simultaneously on stimulated and nonstimulated shoulders.

Results: Blood flow in the trapezius muscle, but not skin blood flow, increased significantly with motor-level 2-Hz TENS, whereas no increase occurred with sensory-level 80-Hz TENS or subliminal 80-Hz TENS.

Discussion and Conclusion: Muscle contractions induced by motor-level 2-Hz TENS appear to be a prerequisite for increasing blood flow in the trapezius muscle. However, high stimulation intensity may prevent increased blood flow in the overlying skin.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 87, no 8, 1047-1055 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-21302DOI: 10.2522/ptj.20060178PubMedID: 17578938OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-21302DiVA: diva2:241007
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-09-30 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved

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Sandberg, Margareta

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