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Theory based assessment of work ability
Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. (Work Assessment)
Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. (Work Assessment)
2009 (English)In: Finnish occupational therapists national conference, Suomen Toimintaterapeuttiliitto ry, September, 2009, Helsinki, Finland: TOI , 2009Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Theory based assessment of work ability

 

In the return to work process, assessments of peoples’ work ability play an important role. Credible and theoretically sound assessment methods for assessing clients’ work ability strengthen the possibilities for making valid interpretations which can guide suitable interventions in the process of returning to work. In this area occupational therapists can offer valuable contribution.

 

A single assessment instrument generally does not address all the multiple factors involved in a client’s work ability. Therefore, assessors should use several instruments in combination. Four instruments frequently used in vocational rehabilitation are:

  • The Assessment of Work Characteristics (AWC) is an observation instrument that describes the extent to which a client has to use different working skills to perform a work task in an efficient and appropriate way.
  • The Assessment of Work Performance (AWP) assesses a client’s observable (working) skills during work performance, i.e. it assesses how efficient and appropriate the client performs a work activity.
  • The Worker Role Interview (WRI) is an interview instrument that focuses on how psychosocial and environmental factors influence a client’s ability to return to work.
  • The Work Environment Impact Scale (WEIS) is an interview instrument that describes how clients experience their work environment.

 

The instruments AWC, AWP, WEIS and WRI  are all based on The Model of Human Occupation (MOHO). MOHO is a theoretical framework that explains the meaning and importance of activities for human beings and offers a conceptual framework for the description of human occupation. Assessment instruments based on theoretical models have the advantage that they create conditions that are conducive to valid interpretations of assessment results and yield intervention strategies.

 

Ongoing and future research will focus on further psychometric evaluation and studies of how and with what results the above instruments could be combined with each other.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Helsinki, Finland: TOI , 2009.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-21478OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-21478DiVA: diva2:241425
Note
Invited speakerAvailable from: 2009-10-02 Created: 2009-10-02 Last updated: 2009-10-03

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Ekbladh, ElinSandqvist, Jan

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf