liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Hg2+ and small-sized polyethylene glycols have inverse effects on membrane permeability, while both impair neutrophil cell motility
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
2004 (English)In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 316, no 2, 370-378 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Toxic effects after exposure to mercury are well documented in human. Little is, however, known about how Hg2+ affect host defense in general and neutrophil functions in particular. We show here that exposure of human neutrophils to HgCl2 dose-dependently impairs chemoattractant-stimulated motility. Long-term exposure (5-10min) to Hg 2+ yields a rapid influx of extracellular Ca2+ followed by leakage of cytosolic fluorophores, as assessed using fura-2 and ratio imaging microscopy. The inhibition on motility was partly reversible, since pre-treated neutrophils placed in an Hg2+-free environment displayed higher migration rates. The Hg2+-induced fluxes were prevented by addition of small-sized polyethylene glycols (PEG 200-400), which also dose-dependently inhibited neutrophil transmigration. Localized, minute micropipette additions of Hg2+ or PEG caused retraction of the leading edge and redirection of cell migration. Since Hg2+ increases and PEGs decrease membrane permeability in a partially competitive manner, we suggest that the known aquaporin-inhibitor Hg2+ alters membrane permeability by affecting the bidirectional flux through the leukocyte aquaporin-9 (AQP9) while small-sized PEGs yield decreased membrane permeability by becoming trapped in the promiscuous channel. The local additions of Hg 2+ or PEG probably force other cell regions to take over from those with blocked AQPs. Hence, the cells turn direction of motility away from the micromanipulator needle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. Vol. 316, no 2, 370-378 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-22298DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2004.02.056Local ID: 1486OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-22298DiVA: diva2:242611
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Loitto, VesaMagnusson, Karl-Eric

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Loitto, VesaMagnusson, Karl-Eric
By organisation
Faculty of Health SciencesMedical Microbiology
In the same journal
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 88 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf