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Passive and dynamic translation in the knee is not influenced by knee exercises in healthy individuals
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1929-0605
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3527-5488
2005 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 15, no 3, 139-147 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

No evidence exists that repeated isolated quadriceps contractions lead to increased sagittal plane tibial translation. The purpose was to analyze passive and dynamic tibial translation before, during and after a specific exercise session, including cycling and a maximum number of knee extensions and heel-raises, in healthy individuals. Passive and dynamic sagittal tibial translation was measured on 18 healthy individuals (nine men and nine women) before, during and after a specific exercise session with heavy load, including cycling and maximum number of knee extensions and heel-raises. Sagittal tibial translation during the Lachman test, maximal isometric quadriceps contraction, one-legged squat and gait was registered with the CA-4000 electrogoniometer. The electromyographic (EMG) activity of m. vastus medialis and lateralis, m. gastrocnemius and mm. hamstrings was registered. There was no difference in passive or dynamic sagittal tibial translation during or after the exercise session. No difference could be detected in EMG activity during squat after compared with before the exercise session. In conclusion, the knee exercises did not influence the amount of translation in healthy individuals. The findings indicate that isolated strength training of quadriceps may be included in anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation programs, even if further specific studies on injured individuals most be performed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2005. Vol. 15, no 3, 139-147 p.
Keyword [en]
knee kinematics; EMG; ACL rehabilitation; exercise; squat; knee extension
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-22680DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0838.2004.00425.xPubMedID: 15885034Local ID: 1970OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-22680DiVA: diva2:242993
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2015-12-18Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Dynamic knee stability after anterior cruciate ligament injury: Emphasis on rehabilitation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic knee stability after anterior cruciate ligament injury: Emphasis on rehabilitation
2008 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Anterior cruciate ligament injury leads to increased sagittal tibial translation, and perceptions of instability and low confidence in the knee joint are common. Many patients have remaining problems despite treatment and are forced to lower their activity level and prematurely end their career in sports. The effect of ACL reconstruction and/or rehabilitation on dynamic knee stability is not completely understood. The overall aim of this thesis was to study the dynamic knee stability during and after rehabilitation in individuals with ACL injury. More specific aims were 1) to elaborate an evaluation method for muscle strength, 2) to evaluate the effect of exercises in closed and open kinetic chain, and 3) to evaluate dynamic knee stability in patients with ACL deficiency or ACL reconstruction.

Sagittal tibial translation and knee flexion angle were measured using the CA‐4000 computerised goniometer linkage. Muscle activation was registered with electromyography.

The intra‐ and inter‐rater reliability of 1 repetition maximum (RM) of seated knee extension was clinically acceptable. The inter‐rater reliability of 1RM of squat was also acceptable, but the intra‐rater reliability was lower. The systematic procedure for the establishment of 1RM that was developed can be recommended for use in the clinic.

One specific exercise session including cycling and a maximum number of knee extensions and heel raises did not influence static or dynamic sagittal tibial translation in uninjured individuals. A comprehensive rehabilitation program with isolated quadriceps training in OKC led to significantly greater isokinetic quadriceps strength compared to CKC rehabilitation in patients with ACL deficiency. Hamstring strength, static and dynamic translation, and functional outcome were similar between groups. Five weeks after ACL reconstruction, seated knee extension produced more anterior tibial translation compared to the straight leg raise and standing on one leg. All exercises produced less or equal amount of anterior tibial translation as the 90N Lachman test.

Five weeks after the ACL reconstruction the static and dynamic tibial translation in the ACL reconstructed knee did not differ from the tibial translation on the uninjured leg. Patients in the early phase after ACL injury or ACL reconstruction used a joint stiffening strategy including a reduced peak knee extension angle during gait and increased hamstring activation during activity, which reduces the dynamic tibial translation. Patients with ACL deficiency that completed a four months rehabilitation program used a movement pattern that was more close to normal.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, 2008. 115 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1036
Keyword
Rehabilitation, anterior cruciate ligament, knee joint, joint instability, muscle strength, electromyography, ACL reconstruction
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-10498 (URN)978-91-85895-05-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2008-03-07, Aulan, Hälsans Hus, Universitetssjukhuset, ing 16, Linköping, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2008-01-28 Created: 2008-01-28 Last updated: 2015-12-18Bibliographically approved

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Tagesson (Sonesson), SofiÖberg, BirgittaKvist, Joanna

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Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports
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