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Monitoring distributed collaboration in the C3Fire microworld
Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8701-8689
2004 (English)In: Scaled worlds: Development, Validation, and Applications / [ed] Samuel G. Schiflett, Linda R. Elliott, Eduardo Salas, Michael D. Coovert, Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing Limited , 2004, -363 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This text identifies and discusses emerging challenges and opportunities arising from advanced-technology simulation-based microworld analogues of operational environments. These "scaled worlds" have been used and advocated for many years. A major transformation is expected in research and training using new, more advanced versions of these systems. Technology now affords new capabilities using PC-based systems. Complex and distributed expert decision making and team performance can be elicited and rehearsed through affordable and easily distributed systems. These new systems will transform the nature of research and training on two fronts: (1) the content internal (i.e. laboratory control) and external validity, and (2) who can do the research and/or training, as these new systems offer more opportunities/options. Organizations and universities are rapidly building internet-based systems to train, educate and/or utilize individuals who may be distributed across the globe. Researchers across the globe will also use these new capabilities, forging new and multi-discipline research as new alliances and collaborations are enabled. Research previously restricted to highly realistic and restricted high-fidelity systems will be open to more participants and these new processes and systems will create new opportunities. Such systems will offer more realism, control and feedback to researchers and trainers. Distributed systems can link multiple nodes, allowing many participants to perform within a shared scenario. Scenarios are more easily constructed and controlled. Opportunities using these internet-based systems are clear, as evidenced by high funding and investments in advanced internet-based training systems. Universities, corporations and DoD organizations are rapidly escalating their use of such systems for collaborative research, education, distributed training and distance learning. These simulation-based systems will rapidly change the nature of research, education and training for most performance domains. Low to medium fidelity environments capture knowledge and performance requirements while retaining high levels of experimental control and generalizability. This book goes further than others on simulation-based training and research (which focus on highly realistic systems) by addressing the issues of scale, fidelity and purpose in more abstracted scaled world systems. It brings together experts who use these systems, from a variety of perspectives. Their contributions document emerging trends and issues with regard to development, utilization and validation of these emerging "scaled world" systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing Limited , 2004. -363 p.
National Category
Computer Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-23802Local ID: 3325ISBN: 978-0-7546-3509-3 (print)ISBN: 0-754-6-3509-0 OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-23802DiVA: diva2:244117
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2015-06-02Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Monitoring distributed teamwork training
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monitoring distributed teamwork training
2002 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In team collaboration training, especially when the training is distributed on the net, it exists a problem of identifying the students' collaboration and work processes. An important design task when developing distributed interactive simulation systems for team training is therefore to define a proper monitoring functionality that will help training managers to evaluate the training. Thus a goal of a computer-based monitoring system is to give training managers help in understanding and assessing the performance of the trainees.

This thesis deals with the design and implementation of monitoring strategies for distributed collaboration training. The aim has been to explore different automatic monitoring strategies, and how they can help a training manger in their task of understanding the students' collaboration during a training session.

To explore possible monitoring strategies, a distributed, net-based micro-world simulation and training system, C3Fire, has been developed and three series of experiments has been performed. C3Fire provides a Command, Control and Communication training environment that can be used for team collaboration training of emergency management tasks. The training domain, which is forest fire fighting, acts as a micro-world, which creates a good dynamic environment for the trainees.

In the three performed studies a total of 192 persons have participated as students. A 132 of these were computer-literate undergraduate students and 60 professional military officers. In these studies four monitoring goals have been explored: the effectiveness of the teams, the information distribution in the organisation, the students situation awareness, and the students work and collaboration methods. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköpings universitet, 2002. 36 p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 746
National Category
Computer Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-35583 (URN)27809 (Local ID)91-7373-312-1 (ISBN)27809 (Archive number)27809 (OAI)
Public defence
2002-05-02, Visionen, Hus B, Linköpings Universitet, Linköping, 13:15 (Swedish)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2012-12-21

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Granlund, RegoJohansson, Björn

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