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The Impact of Patent Rights Regimes on the Commercialisation of Research in Sweden and Germany
Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
2003 (English)In: Neuartige Netzwerke und nachhaltige Entwicklung :: Komplexität und Koordination in Industrie, Stadt und Region / [ed] Wolfram Elsner, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Verlag , 2003, 197-229 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The commercial exploitation of academic knowledge has become increasingly important. New forms for coordinating the knowledge flow from university to industry are being used, such as licensing agreements after patenting of research results or spin-off enterprises whose founders use knowledge developed in the university to start their own businesses. But the efficiency of the different modes of knowledge and technology transfer can differ since norms and institutions influence in many cases the networking capabilities of the agents involved. This chapter analyses the incentive structures in universities that impact on knowledge and technology transfer in Sweden and Germany. In particular, the patent rights regime, defining who has the legal right to exploit the resource -academic knowledge- influences the incentives for networking between different agents involved in the commercialisation of academic research, such as researchers, universities, technology transfer offices, financing organisations, and private industry. The theoretical reasoning concludes that besides the patent rights regime, other major factors influencing commercialisation efforts are the academic reward system, supporting agents, and the funding system. In Sweden where a major share of university research is funded by external sources, the university teachers- privilege can provide incentives towards the commercialisation of academic research. In Germany, where a large share of research is financed by base funding, the patent rights regime seems to be of minor importance for commercialisation. Technology transfer offices are important mediators in both regimes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Verlag , 2003. 197-229 p.
Series
Institutionelle und Sozial-Ökonomie
Keyword [en]
patents, universities
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24410Local ID: 6513ISBN: 3-631-52218-5 (print)ISBN: 978-3-6315-2218-9 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-24410DiVA: diva2:244728
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2013-11-12Bibliographically approved

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Sellenthin, Mark

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf