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Increased mortality in diabetes during the first 10 years of the disease. A population-based study (DISS) in Swedish adults 15-34 years old at diagnosis
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: endomed.
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2001 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, Vol. 249, no 3, 263-270 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives. To study, prospectively, in young adult patients, the mortality during the first years after the diagnosis of diabetes. Design. The Diabetes Incidence Study in Sweden (DISS) aims to register all incident cases aged 15-34 years. During a 10-year period all deaths were identified by record linkage to the national Cause of Death Registry. Subjects. During the period, 4097 new cases were registered and classified as type 1 diabetes (73%), type 2 (16%), secondary (2%) and unclassified (9%). The median follow-up was 5 years (21 001 person-years). Main outcome measures. Calculation of the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Evaluation of all deceased by scrutiny of clinical records, death certificates and autopsy protocols. Results. Fifty-eight patients died, corresponding to an SMR of 3.5 (CI = 2.7-4.5), which increased from 1.5 at 15-19 years to 4.1 at 30-34 years. SMR was 2.7 in primary diabetes: 2.3 (1.6-3.3) in type 1 and 4.1 (2.6-6.7) in type 2. In secondary diabetes, alcohol-associated pancreatitis a common cause, SMR was 32 (CI = 24-45). Evidence of alcohol or drug misuse, mental dysfunction or suicide was found in 40 of all 58 deceased cases. Less often, hypoglycaemia (n = 7) or hyperglycaemia-ketoacidosis (n = 11) was present at death. Unexplained 'dead in bed' was found once. Conclusions. In the investigated population-based cohort the early mortality was about threefold increased. Hypoglycaemia and ketoacidosis per se played a relatively small role compared with a heavy impact from social and mental dysfunction, and from careless use of alcohol or drugs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. Vol. 249, no 3, 263-270 p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24899DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2796.2001.00802.xLocal ID: 9302OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-24899DiVA: diva2:245222
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2011-01-13

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Arnqvist, Hans

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