liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Incidence and management of hot flashes in prostate cancer.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Urology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
2003 (English)In: The journal of supportive oncology, ISSN 1544-6794, Vol. 1, no 4Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Hot flashes are as common in men who have been castrated due to prostate cancer as hot flashes are in women after menopause. The symptom can cause significant discomfort for a considerable length of time. The hot flashes are most likely caused by a reduction in sex-hormone levels, which, in turn, causes an instability in the hypothalamic thermoregulatory center. Calcitonin gene-related peptide is involved in menopausal hot flashes in women and possibly also in castrated men. The mainstays of treatment for castrated men with hot flashes remain estrogens, progesterone, and cyproterone acetate, each of which has different side effects. Other treatments for hot flashes include clonidine and antidepressants and, according to one uncontrolled study, electrostimulated acupuncture. Nonetheless, there is a need for more effective and less toxic treatments. In this review, we will discuss the prevalence, duration, distress, physiology, and treatment options of hot flashes in men subjected to castration therapy due to prostate cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 1, no 4
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-25495Local ID: 9942OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-25495DiVA: diva2:245825
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2011-01-13

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Authority records BETA

Spetz, Anna-ClaraVarenhorst, EberhardHammar, Mats

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Spetz, Anna-ClaraVarenhorst, EberhardHammar, Mats
By organisation
Faculty of Health SciencesObstetrics and gynecologyUrologyDepartment of Urology in ÖstergötlandDepartment of Surgery in Östergötland
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 79 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf