liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Effect of maternal diet during lactation on development of bovine insulin-binding antibodies in children at risk for allergy
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn.
Show others and affiliations
2000 (English)In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 106, no 2, 302-306 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The role of exposure to dietary antigens through maternal milk is intriguing, because it may result either in immunization or in tolerance. Exposure to cow's milk proteins results in antibody formation against bovine insulin in infants at risk for type 1 diabetes. Objective: To study the appearance of IgG antibodies to bovine and human insulin in infants with an atopic family history whose mothers followed a cow's milk-free diet during the first 3 months of lactation. Methods: In a prospective cohort study on prevention of food allergies, 123 infants were exclusively breast-fed or received supplementafion with a hydrolyzed casein-based formula (Nutramigen) until the age of 6 months. The mothers either avoided cow's milk during the first 3 months of lactation (diet group) or had an unrestricted diet (nondiet group). The levels of IgG antibodies to bovine and human insulin were determined by enzyme immunoassay at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months and at 4 years. In addition, cord blood was obtained at birth and a maternal sample at delivery. Results: At 3 months, IgG antibodies to bovine insulin were low in both dietary groups (median levels 0.150 and 0.114 optical density units in the diet and nondiet groups). After exposure to dietary insulin, IgG antibodies to bovine insulin increased in both groups, reaching a peak at 12 months in the nondiet group and at 18 months in the diet group. At 18 months, IgG antibodies to bovine insulin were lower in infants in the nondiet group than in infants in the diet group (0.287 vs 0.500, P < .0001). At 4 years, the antibodies no longer differed between the groups. Conclusion: The exposure to cow's milk proteins through breast milk during the first 3 months of life resulted in decreased levels of antibodies to dietary bovine insulin at 18 months of age, suggesting a role for breast milk antigens in early tolerance induction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2000. Vol. 106, no 2, 302-306 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-25832DOI: 10.1067/mai.2000.108110Local ID: 10269OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-25832DiVA: diva2:246380
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text
By organisation
Faculty of Health SciencesPediatricsBarn
In the same journal
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 17 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf