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Contamination of drinking-water by arsenic in Bangladesh: A public health emergency
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
2000 (English)In: Bulletin of the World Health Organization, ISSN 0042-9686, Vol. 78, no 9, 1093-1103 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The contamination of groundwater by arsenic in Bangladesh is the largest poisoning of a population in history, with millions of people exposed. This paper describes the history of the discovery of arsenic in drinking-water in Bangladesh and recommends intervention strategies. Tube-wells were installed to provide 'pure water' to prevent morbidity and mortality from gastrointestinal disease. The water from the millions of tube-wells that were installed was not tested for arsenic contamination. Studies in other countries where the population has had long-term exposure to arsenic in groundwater indicate that 1 in 10 people who drink water containing 500 ╡g of arsenic per litre may ultimately die from cancers caused by arsenic, including lung, bladder and skin cancers. The rapid allocation of funding and prompt expansion of current interventions to address this contamination should be facilitated. The fundamental intervention is the identification and provision of arsenic-free drinking water. Arsenic is rapidly excreted in urine, and for early or mild cases, no specific treatment is required. Community education and participation are essential to ensure that interventions are successful, these should be coupled with follow-up monitoring to confirm that exposure has ended. Taken together with the discovery of arsenic in groundwater in other countries, the experience in Bangladesh shows that groundwater sources throughout the world that are used for drinking-water should be tested for arsenic.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2000. Vol. 78, no 9, 1093-1103 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-26084Local ID: 10543OAI: diva2:246632
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2011-01-14

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