liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
PCR of Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Bacterial Meningitis During Meningococcal Epidemics: an Example from Sudan
Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, College of Medicine, Juba University, Sudan and Reference Laboratory of Meningitis, Department of Bacteriology, National Health Laboratory, Khartoum, Sudan.
National Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
National Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
National Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2003 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 35, no 10, 719-723 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Meningococcal disease is feared due to its rapid progression and high case fatality rate, especially in the African meningitis belt, where epidemics of meningococcal meningitis appear cyclically. Culture, direct microscopy and antigen detection are the basic methods for diagnosis and species identification of bacterial meningitis. These methods are known to have limitations, especially in developing countries. The aim of the present study was to document the application of PCR technology for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples (n = 52) collected during epidemics in Sudan. In the application of PCR for detection of the causative agent of bacterial meningitis (based on the 16S rRNA gene), bacterial DNA was identified in 49 samples. Common bacterial species causing bacterial meningitis could be detected in 31 of the CSF samples (27 meningococci), while 18 contained DNA, mainly from normally contaminating bacteria. A specific PCR for group A meningococci (based on the sacC gene) was positive in 27 of the CSF samples. The results show that PCR technology is a sharpedged tool for confirmation of a diagnosis of meningococcal meningitis and for obtaining a direct genogrouping of group A meningococci in CSF. It is important to stress the use of direct and specific PCRs to avoid interference by contaminating bacteria, a great problem in samples from areas in the meningitis belt.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 35, no 10, 719-723 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-26558DOI: 10.1080/00365540310016367Local ID: 11120OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-26558DiVA: diva2:247107
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Unemo, MagnusOlcén, Per

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Unemo, MagnusOlcén, Per
In the same journal
Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 37 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf