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A bioacoustic method for timing of the different phases of the breathing cycle and monitoring of breathing frequency
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
2000 (English)In: Medical Engineering and Physics, ISSN 1350-4533, E-ISSN 1873-4030, Vol. 22, no 6, 425-433 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is well known that the flow of air through the trachea during respiration causes vibrations in the tissue near the trachea, which propagate to the surface of the body and can be picked up by a microphone placed on the throat over the trachea. Since the vibrations are a direct result of the airflow, accurate timing of inspiration and expiration is possible. This paper presents a signal analysis solution for automated monitoring of breathing and calculation of the breathing frequency. The signal analysis approach uses tracheal sound variables in the time and frequency domains, as well as the characteristics of the disturbances that can be used to discriminate tracheal sound from noise. One problem associated with the bioacoustic method is its sensitivity for acoustic disturbances, because the microphone tends to pick up all vibrations, independent of their origin. A signal processing method was developed that makes the bioacoustic method clinically useful in a broad variety of situations, for example in intensive care and during certain heart examinations, where information about both the precise timing and the phases of breathing is crucial.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2000. Vol. 22, no 6, 425-433 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-26691DOI: 10.1016/S1350-4533(00)00050-3Local ID: 11279OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-26691DiVA: diva2:247241
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13
In thesis
1. Bioacoustic principles used in monitoring and diagnostic applications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioacoustic principles used in monitoring and diagnostic applications
2002 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The idea behind this work is linked to the experience gained from the long use of the stethoscope, and to the fact that sound originating from the body is a mechanical fingerprint, reflecting the human body functions.

The aims of this thesis have been to develop bioacoustic systems using modern medical signal processing in three applications. The first was to develop a method for monitor the respiration, the second was to develop a detection method for the third heart sound and, the third was to study a swallowing detection technique and look into the potential of bioacoustic development in this area.

Respiratory monitoring is of vital importance in several clinical situations. A bioacoustic signal analysis approach has been developed for monitoring of respiration. This approach includes strategies to differentiate between inspiration and expiration. In two different patient groups, the method has managed to detect 98% of the respiratory cycles.

The third heart sound has been found to be related to heart failure. A tailored wavelet technique has been developed fur detection of the third heart sound. The method has been used in children and in patients with heart failure. The wavelet metod detected 87% of the third heart sounds and only 2% were classified as false positive.

An investigation of an existing method for swallowing detection, computerized laryngeal analyser (CLA), was performed toghether with a pilot study involving swallowing sounds for the detection. The CLA technique was found to be inadequate for swallowing detection. The bioacoustic approach showed promise for detection of swallows.

We expect in the future that bioacoustics will be an important medical field, for diagnosis, monitoring, rehabilitation and education. The methods show potential for increased use, both in hospital and primary care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköpings universitet, 2002. 72 p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 778
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24564 (URN)6729 (Local ID)91-7373-438-1 (ISBN)6729 (Archive number)6729 (OAI)
Public defence
2002-11-08, Aulan, Administrationshuset, Universitetssjukhuset, Linköping, 10:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2013-01-02

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Hult, PeterAsk, PerWranne, Bengt

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