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Management of life-threatening haemoptysis
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
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2002 (English)In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, Vol. 88, 291-295 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Massive haemoptysis represents a major medical emergency that is associated with a high mortality. Here we present two cases of life-threatening haemoptysis, the first caused by rupture of an aortic aneurysm into the lung in a 37-yr-old woman with polyarteritis nodosa and the second caused by massive bleeding from an angiectatic vascular malformation in the right main bronchus in a 21-yr-old woman. Fibreoptic bronchoscopy played an essential role in the diagnostic process and management of the respiratory tract. Diagnosis in the first case was obtained by CT scan and the aneurysm was treated surgically. In the second case, bronchial arteriography contributed to both definitive diagnosis and treatment. Initial cardiorespiratory management, diagnostic procedures and definitive therapy are described and reviewed. Adequate early management of the cardiorespiratory system is essential to the outcome. Aggressive measures to elucidate the cause of haemoptysis and prompt therapy are warranted because of the high risk of recurrence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 88, 291-295 p.
Keyword [en]
Arteries, aortic aneurysm, Blood, massive haemoptysis, Lung, angiectasia, Monitoring, bronchial arteriography, Surgery, bronchoscopy
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-26893DOI: 10.1093/bja/88.2.291Local ID: 11517OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-26893DiVA: diva2:247443
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2009-11-01

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Fransson, Sven GöranSvedjeholm, Rolf

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Fransson, Sven GöranSvedjeholm, Rolf
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Faculty of Health SciencesAnaesthesiologyDepartment of Thoracic and Vascular SurgeryThoracic SurgeryRadiologyDepartment of Cardiology
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British Journal of Anaesthesia
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