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Coping strategies and life satisfaction in subgrouped fibromyalgia patients
Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
2003 (English)In: Biological Research for Nursing, ISSN 1099-8004, E-ISSN 1552-4175, Vol. 4, no 3, 193-202 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study describes pain- and stress-coping strategies and life satisfaction in subgroups of fibromyalgia patients. Thirty-two females with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and 21 healthy pain-free women were studied. Those with FMS were classified as thermal (both heat and cold) pain sensitive or slightly cold pain sensitive based on pain thresholds determined using a Thermotest device. Global stress-coping styles, life satisfaction, and specific pain-coping strategies were measured. Patients classified as thermal pain sensitive were affected by physical symptoms to a greater extent than were those classified as slightly cold pain sensitive. The thermal pain sensitive group used more diverting attention coping strategies than the slightly cold pain sensitive group did. Separating fibromyalgia patients into subgroups might increase the potential for improving nursing care of these patients. Through the use of effective coping strategies in dealing with stress and pain, life satisfaction may also be enhanced.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 4, no 3, 193-202 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-26942DOI: 10.1177/1099800402239622Local ID: 11570OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-26942DiVA: diva2:247492
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Identification of subgroups in experimental and chronic pain: Sensory, emotional and evaluative aspects
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of subgroups in experimental and chronic pain: Sensory, emotional and evaluative aspects
2002 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

One hundred and two healthy subjects, 32 fibromyalgia patients and 12 chronic low back pain patients were included in the study. Quantitative sensory tests were performed to identify thermal hyperalgesia in the fibromyalgia group and to compare the results with those in healthy pain-free subjects. Different questionnaires were used to map pain and stress-coping strategies /styles. (Coping Strategy Questionnaire, Jalowiec Coping Scale) and quality of life (Life Satisfaction Questionnaire and the SF-36).

Both healthy subjects and fibromyalgia patients suffering from chronic pain could be subgrouped according to experimental pain perception. On comparing the fibromyalgia subgroups, differences in both stress and pain-coping strategies were found. Thus, the confrontative stress-coping style was used more in the thermal painsensitive group than the others. Furthermore, attention-diverting and catastrophising pain-coping strategies were more frequent.

The chronic back-pain patients who had decreased their catastrophising pain-coping strategy at the 3-year follow-up also perceived an improved quality of life at the 6-year follow-up.

When. self-scoring life satisfaction, thermal pain-sensitive fibromyalgia patients experienced significantly more physical symptoms than slightly cold pain-sensitive patients and healthy subjects. They also had sleep disturbances, more tender points, more affective hand pain and increased hand pain intensity.

The relation between sensation and emotion must be regarded as a product of a conscious mind while the emotional part of the pain sensation is not just a passive response to an external stimulus.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköpings universitet, 2002. 51 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 714
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-27538 (URN)12196 (Local ID)91-7373-156-0 (ISBN)12196 (Archive number)12196 (OAI)
Public defence
2002-01-11, Berzeliussalen, Hälsouniversitetet, Linköping, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2012-09-18Bibliographically approved

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Raak, RagnhildHurtig, IngridWahren, Lis Karin

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