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A pilot study of body awareness programs in the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
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2000 (English)In: Arthritis Care and Research, ISSN 0893-7524, E-ISSN 1529-0123, Vol. 13, no 5, 304-311 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. To compare in a pilot study the effect of two physical therapies, the Mensendieck system (MS) and body awareness therapy (BAT) according to Roxendal, in fibromyalgia patients and to investigate differences in effect between the two interventions. Methods. Twenty female patients were randomized to either MS or BAT in a program lasting 20 weeks. Evaluations were tender point examination and questionnaires, including visual analog scales (pain intensity at worst site, muscular stiffness, evening fatigue, and global health), Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Coping Strategies Questionnaire, Quality of Life Scales, Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale (ASES), and disability before, immediately after, and at 6 and 18 months followup. Results. The BAT group had improved global health at 18 months followup, but lower results than the MS group. The MS group had improved FIQ, ASES other symptoms, and pain at worst site at 18 months followup. Conclusion. In the present pilot study, MS was associated with more positive changes than BAT.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2000. Vol. 13, no 5, 304-311 p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-27628Local ID: 12364OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-27628DiVA: diva2:248180
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13

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Aspegren Kendall, SallyGerdle, BjörnHenriksson, Karl-Gösta

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Aspegren Kendall, SallyGerdle, BjörnHenriksson, Karl-Gösta
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Faculty of Health SciencesRehabilitation MedicinePain and Rehabilitation CentreDivision of PhysiotherapyNeurophysiologyDepartment of Neurology
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Arthritis Care and Research
Medical and Health Sciences

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