LiU Electronic Press
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Author:
Magnusson, Martin (Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, KPLAB - Knowledge Processing Lab) (Linköping University, The Institute of Technology)
Doherty, Patrick (Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, KPLAB - Knowledge Processing Lab) (Linköping University, The Institute of Technology)
Title:
Planning Speech Acts in a Logic of Action and Change
Department:
Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, KPLAB - Knowledge Processing Lab
Linköping University, The Institute of Technology
Publication type:
Conference paper (Other academic)
Language:
English
In:
The Swedish AI Society Workshop 2009, SAIS 2009
Editor:
Fredrik Heintz and Jonas Kvarnström
Conference:
25th annual workshop of the Swedish Artificial Intelligence Society (SAIS 2009), 27-28 May 2009, Linköping, Sweden
Publisher: Linköping University Electronic Press, Linköpings universitet
Series:
Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings, ISSN 1650-3686 (print), 1650-3740 (online); 35
Pages:
39-48
Year of publ.:
2009
URI:
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-28259
Permanent link:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-28259
Subject category:
Engineering and Technology
SVEP category:
TECHNOLOGY
Abstract(en) :

Cooperation is a complex task that necessarily involves communication and reasoning about others’ intentions and beliefs. Multi-agent communication languages aid designers of cooperating robots through standardized speech acts, sometimes including a formal semantics. But a more direct approach would be to have the robots plan both regular and communicative actions themselves. We show how two robots with heterogeneous capabilities can autonomously decide to cooperate when faced with a task that would otherwise be impossible. Request and inform speech acts are formulated in the same first-order logic of action and change as is used for regular actions. This is made possible by treating the contents of communicative actions as quoted formulas of the same language. The robot agents then use a natural deduction theorem prover to generate cooperative plans for an example scenario by reasoning directly with the axioms of the theory.

Available from:
2009-10-09
Created:
2009-10-09
Last updated:
2013-06-28
Statistics:
26 hits