liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Inhibition of the bladder cooling reflex in the awake state: An experimental study in the cat
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology.
2004 (English)In: Journal of Urology, ISSN 0022-5347, Vol. 172, no 5 I, 2051-2053 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: We assessed the bladder cooling reflex in the awake cat. The bladder cooling reflex is consistently observed in anesthetized adult cats but not in awake, neurologically normal humans. This discrepancy could indicate a state dependant control of the reflex or a species difference. This study was designed to differentiate between these alternatives. Materials and Methods: Under ketamine-xylazine 5 animals had an indwelling catheter inserted into the bladder. The cooling reflex was tested by injections of cold saline into the bladder (4C to 8C), lowering its wall temperature to about 30C to 32C. The volume used (5 ml) was subthreshold for the Aδ micturition reflex, as confirmed by control injections of body warm saline. The procedure was repeated with the animals fully awake and it was well tolerated by all of them. Reflex responses were assessed by induced bladder pressures. Results: Typical bladder cooling reflexes with peak pressures greater than 3 kPa were evoked in all cats when in narcotic sleep (group mean ± CI 7.4 ± 3.1 kPa). No such reflexes were elicited when the animals were awake (2.0 ± 1.0 kPa). The difference was significant at the level of individual animals. Conclusions: The bladder cooling reflex is suppressed in adult cats during wakefulness, as in humans. This state dependent control of the bladder cooling reflex adds to its resemblance to the extensor plantar response (Babinski's sign).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. Vol. 172, no 5 I, 2051-2053 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-28786DOI: 10.1097/01.ju.0000134381.95274.a4Local ID: 13970OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-28786DiVA: diva2:249598
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2011-01-12

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Lindström, SivertJiang, Chonghe

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lindström, SivertJiang, Chonghe
By organisation
Faculty of Health SciencesDivision of cell biology
In the same journal
Journal of Urology
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 34 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf