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Power and Supply Chain Captaincy
Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Logistics.
Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Logistics.
2006 (English)In: International Symposium on Logistics, ISL,2006, Proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on Logistics: The University of Nottingham / Tsingua University , 2006, 319- p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Supply chain management (SCM) is a philosophy/concept that has grown tremendously in popularity over the last decade or so, in industry as well as in academia (Stock and Lambert, 2001). One of the more recognised definitions is that of Lambert and Cooper (2000), which reads: -Supply chain management is the integration of key business processes from end user through original suppliers that provides products, services, and information that add value for customers and stakeholders.- (Lambert and Cooper, 2000, p 1) However, except from a few best practice cases, empirical research shows that collaboration based on the SCM philosophy is not common practice in today-s supply chains (Sandberg, 2005, Speakman et al, 1998). One reason for the poor SCM realisation could be the absence of a channel captain in the supply chain. The term channel captain has been introduced and discussed briefly in the SCM literature from time to time, and the need for a channel captain is by some authors (e.g. Cooper and Ellram, 1993) considered a necessary prerequisite for the realisation of collaborative supply chain initiatives. In short, the channel captain role implies that one supply chain member holds the baton and leads the way for all the others. A fundamental notion regarding the role of a channel captain is that it implies that the party in question has some form of influence over the other members of the supply chain, as to how they behave and act. In somewhat general terms it could be argued that when one party can influence another party, the former party can be attributed some form of power. Thus, the possession of power over other supply chain members is fundamental for a channel captain role. Even if some SCM authors briefly discuss the channel captain role, the literature field to date does not seem to address it more in detail. One reason for this could be the absence of a power discussion in SCM articles, which is needed for a more thorough discussion on the subject. In order to gain a better insight into the channel captain role, this paper therefore incorporates literature concerning power from both the field of social science and marketing channel and relates these theories to the channel captain role in a supply chain. The purpose with the paper is to illustrate how a company, which can be considered as a channel captain, can actively use its power to improve a supply chain-s performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on Logistics: The University of Nottingham / Tsingua University , 2006. 319- p.
Keyword [en]
scm, channel captain, power
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-30475Local ID: 16049OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-30475DiVA: diva2:251297
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09

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Kohn, ChristoferSandberg, Erik

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