liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Computed tomography - A possible aid in the diagnosis of smoke inhalation injury?
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
Show others and affiliations
2005 (English)In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 49, no 2, 257-260 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inhalation injury is an important contributor to morbidity and mortality in burn victims and can trigger acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (1-3). Early diagnosis and treatment of inhalation injury are important, but a major problem in planning treatment and evaluating the prognosis has been the lack of consensus about diagnostic criteria (4). Chest radiographs on admission are often non-specific (5, 6), but indicators include indoor fires, facial burns, bronchoscopic findings of soot in the airways, and detection of carbon monoxide or cyanide in the blood (7). Changes in the lungs may be detected by bronchoscopy with biopsy, xenon imaging, or measurement of pulmonary extracellular fluid (4, 5, 8). These methods have, however, been associated with low sensitivity and specificity, as exemplified by the 50% predictive value in the study of Masanes et al. (8). Computed tomographs (CTs) are better than normal chest radiographs in the detection of other pulmonary lesions such as pulmonary contusion (9, 10). The importance of CT scans in patients with ARDS has been reviewed recently (9), but unfortunately there has been no experience of CT in patients with smoke inhalation injury. To our knowledge, there are only two animal studies reporting that smoke inhalation injury can be detected by CT (4, 11), specific changes in human CT scans have not yet been described. Therefore, confronted with a patient with severe respiratory failure after a burn who from the history and physical examination showed the classic risk factors for inhalation injury, we decided to request a CT. © Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 49 (2005).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 49, no 2, 257-260 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-31092DOI: 10.1111/j.1399-6576.2004.00592.xLocal ID: 16822OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-31092DiVA: diva2:251915
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Bak, ZoltanSamuelsson, AndersSjöberg, Folke

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Bak, ZoltanSamuelsson, AndersSjöberg, Folke
By organisation
Faculty of Health SciencesAnaesthesiologyDepartment of Intensive Care UHLDivision of surgeryDepartment of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL
In the same journal
Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 141 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf