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Inhalation injury assessed by score does not contribute to the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome in burn victims
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
2005 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 31, no 3, 263-268 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To establish the incidence, mortality, and time of onset of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in relation to extent of burn and inhalation injury in patients who required mechanical ventilation. Design: Data about burn and inhalation injury were recorded prospectively whereas ARDS and multiple organ dysfunction were assessed by review of patient charts. Setting: National burn intensive care unit at Linköping University Hospital, Sweden (a tertiary referral hospital). Patients: Between 1993 and 1999, we studied all patients with thermal injury (n = 553) who required mechanical ventilation for more than two days (n = 91). Measurements and results: Out of the thirty-six burn victims who developed ARDS (40%), 25 (70%) did so early post burn (in less than 6 days). Patients with ARDS had higher multiple organ dysfunction scores (mean 10.5) than those who did not develop ARDS (mean 5.6) (p < 0.01). The probable presence of inhalation injury as assessed by an inhalation lung injury score (ILIS) did not contribute to the development of ARDS. Mortality tended to be higher in patients who developed ARDS (14%) compared to those who did not (6%, p = 0.2). Conclusions: In our burn patients the incidence of ARDS was high whereas mortality was low. We found no association between inhalation injury as assessed using the ILIS and development of ARDS. Our data support a multi-factorial origin of ARDS in burn victims as a part of a multiple organ failure event. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 31, no 3, 263-268 p.
Keyword [en]
burns, smoke inhalation injury, respiratory distress syndrome, acute, ventilation, mechanical, multiple organ failure
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-31549DOI: 10.1016/j.burns.2004.11.003Local ID: 17350OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-31549DiVA: diva2:252372
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13

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Bak, ZoltanSjöberg, Folke

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Faculty of Health SciencesAnaesthesiologyDepartment of Intensive Care UHLDivision of surgeryDepartment of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL
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