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Time components of circulatory transport from the lungs to a peripheral artery in humans
Karolinska Institutet .
Karolinska Institutet .
Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
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2006 (English)In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 97, no 1, 96-102 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Blood gas changes occurring in the lung undergo delay and damping on their way to a peripheral artery sampling site. Knowledge of the time components of circulatory transfer is important for the understanding of respiratory control and cardiovascular reflexes in response to blood gas transients. Providing steady state with regard to V̇A/ Q̇ distribution, cardiac output and peripheral blood flow, the relationship between the time courses of small end-tidal and peripheral PO2 changes is determined by the transfer function of the interposed vascular segment. This transfer function, expressed as delay time TD and mean transit time (MTT), was measured in six well-trained subjects, allowing the calculation of arterial time-courses from end-tidal to the reverse. They were studied at rest and during four different dynamic leg exercise intensities in the supine posture. TD and MTT amounted to 15.8 ± 1.7 (mean ± SEM) and 18.3 ± 2.1 s at rest and were shortened to 7.7 ± 0.6 and 11.5 ± 1.8 s during exercise at 170 W. The shortening of TD and MTT did not appear to be simply an inverse function of cardiac output, suggesting that the shortening occurs in the central circulatory segment but not in the arm segment. © Springer-Verlag 2006.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 97, no 1, 96-102 p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-32555DOI: 10.1007/s00421-006-0144-6Local ID: 18468OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-32555DiVA: diva2:253378
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13

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Gill, Hans

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