liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Good self-rated health is related to psychosocial resources and a strong cortisol response to acute stress: The LiVicordia study of middle-aged men
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
Vilnius University, Lithuania.
2005 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 12, no 3, 153-160 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Self-rated health (SRH) is a strong predictor for disease and death. The relations among SRH, psychosocial factors, and cortisol dynamics were tested using pooled data from the LiVicordia study of 50-year-old men in Lithuania (n = 94) and Sweden (n = 89), controlling for effect of residence. SRH was assessed by " How would you assess your own health?" A standardized laboratory stress test included measures of cortisol in serum and saliva. Good SRH related to high scale scores of decision latitude, social support at work, coping, self-esteem, and sense of coherence, to low scores of overcommitment (all p < .01) and vital exhaustion (r = -0.40, p < 0.001), to low concentrations of saliva baseline cortisol (r = -.26, p = .001), and to a strong cortisol response to stress (r = .27, p = .001). Findings that good SRH related to favorable psychosocial characteristics and to a dynamic cortisol stress response indicate a possible explanation for observed lower risk for disease and death in this state. Copyright © 2005 by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 12, no 3, 153-160 p.
Keyword [en]
self-rated health, psychosocial resources, stress, cortisol
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-32930DOI: 10.1207/s15327558ijbm1203_4Local ID: 18879OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-32930DiVA: diva2:253753
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Kristenson, MargaretaOlsson, Anders

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kristenson, MargaretaOlsson, Anders
By organisation
Faculty of Health SciencesDivision of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health ScienceCentre for Public Health SciencesInternal MedicineDepartment of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL
In the same journal
International Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Social Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 162 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf