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Group mind in Christian communities
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0202-4650
Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
2006 (English)In: Nordic Psychology, ISSN 1901-2276, E-ISSN 1904-0016, Vol. 58, 74-88 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, group movements in different Christian communities were analysed by use of an expanded model of Janis' (1972, 1982) concept groupthink (Granstrom & Stiwne, 1998). Much research in the psychology of religion has focused on individual differences. The focus of this study was on religious groups qua group, and processes that may influence their work and primary task. The groups studied were classified in one of three organisational clusters based on their way of organising work - ranging from more teamwork to more hierarchical oriented organisations. The results showed that there were considerable differences between different religious groups as to their groupthink tendencies, indicating that religiosity as such is not a sufficient explanation of group dynamics in such groups. However, the way of organising work may be an important factor for understanding groupthink tendencies. Another contribution was the application of the concept groupthink to rather ordinary religious groups. Groupthink has mainly been used to explain political, military or industrial fiascos. In this case the concept was applied to everyday life pointing to its explanatory value.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 58, 74-88 p.
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-34224Local ID: 21041OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-34224DiVA: diva2:255072
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13

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Rosander, MichaelGranström, KjellStiwne, Dan

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