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The power of categorisation in the study of everyday life
Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4133-1204
Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4133-1204
2006 (English)In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 13, no 1, 37-48 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How do categorisation schemes influence the results in studies of everyday life? This article identifies the consequences of using an empirically generated category scheme (EGCS) versus an analytically derived category scheme (ADCS) based on a two-step comparison. In the first step, the same diary was coded using both the ADCS and EGCS, and the results compared. This step showed that EGCS has greater potential to distinguish between everyday occupational patterns because the categories are more specific, even at the least detailed level. The comparison is, however, somewhat unfair since the main categories differ. To avoid this problem, a second step was taken transforming the ADCS-codes into EGCS, resulting in EGCSt (t=translated). The diary coded directly by EGCS gave more detailed results than by EGCSt, but both are potentially better able to distinguish between different everyday occupational patterns than the ADCS. It is suggested that EGCS might be useful in occupational science because it comprises the whole day, its classification of occupations is specific, and it has been shown to be useful for individual rehabilitation purposes as well as for describing and analysing everyday life on individual, household and population levels. For example EGCS can better detect the everyday life of a mother since EGCS specifies various kinds of household occupations at main category level. Further, if ADCS-coded diaries are translated into EGCSt similar results are yielded, however, more vague. The EGCS classification of occupations is suggested when policy changes are to be made, since a democratic dialogue between policy makers and citizens is facilitated when people can recognise conditions that resemble their daily lives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 13, no 1, 37-48 p.
Keyword [en]
category schemes, occupation, daily life, time-geography
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-34536Local ID: 21723OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-34536DiVA: diva2:255384
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13

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