liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A longitudinal study of reading skills among very-low-birthweight children: Is there a catch-up?
Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
Dept of Neuroradiology, KS, Stockholm .
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
Show others and affiliations
2006 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology, ISSN 0146-8693, E-ISSN 1465-735X, Vol. 31, no 9, 967-977 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To examine the development of reading skills among very-low-birthweight (VLBW) children and to what extent reading difficulties at 9 years of age persist unchanged, are attenuated, or are enhanced at 15 years of age. Methods: Fifty-six VLBW and 52 normal birthweight (NBW) children were assessed on word decoding, word recognition, and reading comprehension at 9 and 15 years of age. Results: VLBW children showed deficits in reading skill at 9 years of age, while most differences obtained at 15 years of age did not reach significance. VLBW children improved their reading comprehension between 9 and 15 years of age more than NBW children, and when controlling for individual differences in IQ, VLBW children improved both their reading comprehension and word-recognition skill. Conclusion: The results suggest that VLBW children display positive changes over time in reading skills. © The Author 2006. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 31, no 9, 967-977 p.
Keyword [en]
longitudinal study, low-birthweight, reading skills
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-34829DOI: 10.1093/jpepsy/jsj108Local ID: 23510OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-34829DiVA: diva2:255677
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Samuelsson, StefanFinnström, OrvarGäddlin, Per-OlofLeijon, IngemarWadsby, Marie

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Samuelsson, StefanFinnström, OrvarGäddlin, Per-OlofLeijon, IngemarWadsby, Marie
By organisation
Faculty of Arts and SciencesTeaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational SettingsFaculty of Health SciencesPediatricsDepartment of Paediatrics in LinköpingChild and Adolescent Psychiatry
In the same journal
Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 83 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf