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A multiple-ligand approach to extending the dynamic range of analyte quantification in protein microarrays
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
2009 (English)In: Biosensors and bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, Vol. 24, no 8, 2458-2464 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This work describes a concept for extending the dynamic range of quantification in an affinity biosensor assay by using a set of ligands with different affinities toward a common analyte. For a demonstration of the principle, three synthetic, biotinylated polypeptides capable of binding a model protein analyte with different affinities (10-9 M ≤ Kd ≤ 10-7 M) were immobilized in a microarray format on a gold slide covered with an oligo(ethylene glycol)-containing alkane thiolate self-assembled monolayer. For controllable immobilization, coupling was mediated by the biotinneutravidin interaction. A five-element affinity array, comprising single-peptide spots as well as spots where peptides were immobilized in mixtures, was realized by means of piezodispensation. Imaging surface plasmon resonance was used to study binding of the analyte to the different spots. The lower limit of quantification was ~3 nM and the corresponding upper limit was increased by more than an order of magnitude compared to if only the highest-affinity ligand would have been used. Affinity array sensors with multiple ligands for each analyte are particularly interesting for omitting dilution steps and providing highly accurate data in assays where several analytes such as disease biomarkers with extremely variable concentrations are quantified in parallel.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 24, no 8, 2458-2464 p.
Keyword [en]
Imaging surface plasmon resonance, Biosensor, Affinity microarray, Analyte quantification, Synthetic polypeptide
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14922DOI: 10.1016/j.bios.2008.12.030OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-14922DiVA: diva2:25577
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2008-09-30 Last updated: 2015-05-29
In thesis
1. Imaging surface plasmon resonance
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Imaging surface plasmon resonance
2008 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The central theme of this thesis is the use of imaging Surface Plasmon Resonance (iSPR) as a tool in the characterization of surfaces with laterally varying properties. Within the scope of this work, an instrument for iSPR analysis was designed and built. SPR is a very sensitive technique for monitoring changes in optical properties in the immediate vicinity of a sensor surface, which is very useful in biosensing and surface science research. We have employed SPR in the Kretschmann configuration, wherein surface plasmons are excited by means of an evanescent field arising from total internal reflection from the backside of the sensor surface. In iSPR, the signal is the reflectivity of TM-polarized light which is measured using an imaging detector, typically a CCD camera. Advantages of this technique include extreme surface sensitivity and, because detection is done from the backside, compatibility with complex samples. In addition, SPR is a non-labeling technique, and in imaging mode, a lateral resolution in the µm range can be attained.

The imaging SPR instrument could be operated in either wavelength interrogation mode or in intensity mode. In the former case, the objective is to find the SPR wave-length, λSPR, which is the wavelength at which the reflected intensity is at a minimum. In intensity mode, a snapshot of the intensity reflectance is taken at a fixed wavelength hand incidence angle.

In biosensor science, the use of an imaging technique offers a major advantage by enabling parallelization and thereby increasing throughput. We have, for example, used iSPR in biochemical interaction analysis to monitor immobilization and specific binding to protein and synthetic polypeptide micro arrays. The primary interest has been the study of soft matter surfaces that possess properties interesting in the field of biomimetics or for applications in biosensing. Specifically, the surfaces studied in this thesis include patterned self-assembled monolayers of thiolates on gold, a graft polymerized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogel, a dextran hydrogel, and a polyelectrolyte charge gradient. Our results show that the PEG-based hydrogel is very well suited for use as a platform in protein immobilization in an array format, owing to the very low unspecific binding. In addition, well defined microarray templates were designed by patterning of hydrophobic barriers on dextran and monolayer surfaces. A polypeptide affinity microarray was further designed and immobilized on such a patterned monolayer substrate, in order to demonstrate the potential of analyte quantification with high sensitivity over a large dynamic range.

Furthermore, iSPR was combined with electrochemistry to enable laterally resolved studies of electrochemical surface reactions. Using this combination, the electrochemical properties of surfaces patterned with self assembled monolayers can be studied in parallel, with a spatial resolution in the µm regime. We have also employed electrochemistry and iSPR for the investigation of potential and current density gradients on bipolar electrodes.

The imaging SPR instrument could be operated in either wavelength interrogation mode or in intensity mode. In the former case, the objective is to find the SPR wave-length, λSPR, which is the wavelength at which the reflected intensity is at a minimum. In intensity mode, a snapshot of the intensity reflectance is taken at a fixed wavelength hand incidence angle.In biosensor science, the use of an imaging technique offers a major advantage by enabling parallelization and thereby increasing throughput. We have, for example, used iSPR in biochemical interaction analysis to monitor immobilization and specific binding to protein and synthetic polypeptide micro arrays. The primary interest has been the study of soft matter surfaces that possess properties interesting in the field of biomimetics or for applications in biosensing. Specifically, the surfaces studied in this thesis include patterned self-assembled monolayers of thiolates on gold, a graft polymerized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogel, a dextran hydrogel, and a polyelectrolyte charge gradient. Our results show that the PEG-based hydrogel is very well suited for use as a platform in protein immobilization in an array format, owing to the very low unspecific binding. In addition, well defined microarray templates were designed by patterning of hydrophobic barriers on dextran and monolayer surfaces. A polypeptide affinity microarray was further designed and immobilized on such a patterned monolayer substrate, in order to demonstrate the potential of analyte quantification with high sensitivity over a large dynamic range.Furthermore, iSPR was combined with electrochemistry to enable laterally resolved studies of electrochemical surface reactions. Using this combination, the electrochemical properties of surfaces patterned with self assembled monolayers can be studied in parallel, with a spatial resolution in the µm regime. We have also employed electrochemistry and iSPR for the investigation of potential and current density gradients on bipolar electrodes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2008. 68 p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 1205
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14923 (URN)978-91-7393-820-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2008-09-26, Planck, Fysikhuset, Campus Valla, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2008-09-30 Last updated: 2017-01-11Bibliographically approved

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Andersson, OlofNikkinen, HenrikKanmert, DanielEnander, Karin

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