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Thermal thresholds and catastrophizing in individuals with chronic pain after whiplash injury
Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
2006 (English)In: Biological Research for Nursing, ISSN 1099-8004, E-ISSN 1552-4175, Vol. 8, no 2, 138-146 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Thermal sensitivity, thermal pain thresholds, and catastrophizing were examined in individuals with whiplash associated disorders (WAD) and in healthy pain-free participants. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) was used to measure skin sensitivity to cold and warmth and cold and heat pain thresholds over both the thenar eminence and the trapezius muscle (TrM) in 17 participants with WAD (age 50.8± 11.3 years) and 18 healthy participants (age 44.8± 10.2 years). The Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) was used to determine pain coping strategies, and visual analogue scales were used for self-assessment of current background pain in individuals in the WAD group as well as experienced pain intensity and unpleasantness after QST and sleep quality in all participants. There were significant differences in warmth threshold and cold and heat pain thresholds of the TrM site between the WAD and pain-free groups. Significant differences between the two groups were also found for the catastrophizing dimension of helplessness in the PCS and in self-assessed quality of sleep. A correlational analysis showed that current background pain is significantly correlated with both cold discrimination and cold pain threshold in the skin over the TrM in individuals with WAD. These findings imply that thermal sensitivity is an important factor to consider in providing nursing care to individuals with WAD. Because biopsychosocial factors also influence the experience of pain in individuals with WAD, the role of nurses includes not only the description of the pain phenomenon but also the identification of relieving and aggravating factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 8, no 2, 138-146 p.
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Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-35629DOI: 10.1177/1099800406291078Local ID: 28017OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-35629DiVA: diva2:256477
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved

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Raak, RagnhildWallin, Mia

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  • apa
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