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Probiotics for the Prevention of Beta Cell Autoimmunity in Children at Genetic Risk of Type 1 Diabetes—the PRODIA Study
Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Valio Ltd, Helsinki, Finland.
Department of Clinical Microbiology, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland and Immunogenetics Laboratory, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
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2006 (English)In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 1079, 360-364 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The final aim of the PRODIA study is to determine whether the use of probiotics during the first 6 months of life decreases the appearance of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM)-associated autoantibodies in children with genetic risk for T1DM. A pilot study including 200 subjects was planned to show whether the use of probiotics during the first 6 months of life is safe and feasible. The prevalence of autoantibodies among the study subjects at 6, 12, and 24 months of age was at levels close to the expected and the clinical follow-up did not either indicate problems in the feasibility of the study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 1079, 360-364 p.
Keyword [en]
type 1 diabetes, probiotics, autoantibodies
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-35923DOI: 10.1196/annals.1375.055ISI: 000243126100055Local ID: 29080OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-35923DiVA: diva2:256771
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
In thesis
1. Pilot studies of probiotics in the prevention of type 1 diabetes
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pilot studies of probiotics in the prevention of type 1 diabetes
2007 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Type 1 diabetes (TlD) is considered to be an autoimmune disease leading to destruction of the insulin producing beta cells in pancreas. Interaction between genetic factors and environmental factors are believed to trigger the autoimmune response finally causing T1D. A number of environmental factors have been suggested to be associated with TlD. Microbiotic colonization of the newborn infant's gut ecosystem by specific bacterial species may be important in the initial regulation of the developing immune system. Development of TlD has been associated with intestinal immune activation and enhanced immunity to food antigens. Probiotics is defined as nonpathogenic cultures of living bacteria with a health-promoting effect. The effect of probiotics is unspecific, likely mediated via the modulation of the innate immune system. The actions of probiotics in the prevention of TID could include reduced occurrence of enteral virus infections, enhanced maturation of the gut immune system, decreased gut permeability, and support for development of oral tolerance and/or induced immune regulation. The aim was to test the safety of probiotics in infants with risk genes for TlD and to study the effect of probiotics on the activation stage of monocytes ex vivo and on their response to in vitro LTA and LPS stimulation. We conclude that probiotics seems to be safe and we demonstrate here to our knowledge the first evidence in humans that probiotics are able to modulate the function of monocytes in vivo and even longstanding effects of the treatment during the early infancy are seen. The findings support the hygiene hypothesis suggesting that early microbial exposure may program the function of the innate immune system for later life. The probiotic induced hyporesponsiveness of the innate immune system to stimuli may protect from over-whelming inflammatory responses that could further contribute to the development of harmful innate and adaptive immune responses seen in allergies and autoimmune diseases. These results explain, at least partly, the beneficial effects of probiotics seen in the prevention and treatment of allergies in children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköpings universitet, 2007. 30 p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Health Sciences. Thesis, ISSN 1100-6013 ; 81
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-38372 (URN)44005 (Local ID)978-91-85831-60-9 (ISBN)44005 (Archive number)44005 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2013-09-20

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Ljungberg, MartinLudvigsson, JohnnyVaarala, Outi

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