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On Aircraft Fuel System Conceptual Design - Conceptual Evaluation and System modeling
Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
2004 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

THE LARGEST AND most important fluid system in an aircraft is the fuel system. Obviously, future aircraft projects involve the design of fuel system to some degree. In this project design methodologies for aircraft fuel systems are studied, with the aim to shortening the system development time.

This is done by means of illustrative examples of how optimization and the use of matrix methods have been developed and implemented at Saab Aerospace in the conceptual design of ale fuel systems. The methods introduces automation early in the development process and increase understanding of how top requirements on the ale level impact low-level engineering parameters such as pipe diameter, pump size, etc.

The thesis also discusses a systematic approach when building a large simulation model of a fluid system where the objective is to minirnize the development time by applying a strategy that enables parallel development and collaborative engineering, and also by building the mode! to the correct level of detail. By correct level of detail is meant the level that yields a simulation outcome that meets the stakeholders' expectations. The experienced gained at Saab in building a simulation model, mainly from the Gripen fuel system, but also the accumulated experience from other system models, is condensed and fitted into an overall process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2004. , 52 + 4 articles p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Thesis, ISSN 0280-7971 ; 1081
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-36010Local ID: LiU-Tek-Lic-2004:10ISBN: 91-7373-923-5 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-36010DiVA: diva2:256858
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2014-01-21Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Fuel Transfer System in the Conceptual Design Phase
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fuel Transfer System in the Conceptual Design Phase
2002 (English)In: SAE World Aviation congress and Display, Phoenix, USA paper 2002-01-2931, 2002, no 2002-01-2931Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

As the time between different development projects of new aircraft (a/c) extends, experienced personnel in the field of basic a/c system design are difficult to employ when being on the onset of a new design. Further on basic a/c system design is a field neglected in literature and in the educational system.

A text is under development that summarizes the Saab experience of the complete fuel system design with respect to the fighter a/c Viggen and Gripen, the commuter a/c 340 and 2000, the trainer a/c SK60 and also the conceptual a/c B3LA.

This paper is an extract of this text and describe early considerations that have to be made when designing a fuel transfer system. Emphasis is put on the top requirements on a/c level.

Series
SAE technical paper series, ISSN 0148-7191
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12987 (URN)10.4271/2002-01-2931 (DOI)
Conference
SAE World Aviation congress and Display, November 5-7, Phoenix, USA
Available from: 2008-04-01 Created: 2008-04-01 Last updated: 2014-01-21Bibliographically approved
2. Using Optimization as a Tool in Fuel System Conceptual Design
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using Optimization as a Tool in Fuel System Conceptual Design
2003 (English)In: SAE World Aviation Congress and Display, Montreal, Canada, SAE Technical Paper 2003-01-3054, 2003, no 2003-01-3052Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Choosing between concepts is often the most critical part of the design process. Different concepts have different advantages and disadvantages. The concept that is the best choice is most often dependent on the top level requirements. Sometimes there may also be a trade off between concept choice and the top requirements. In aircraft (a/c) fuel system design it has often proved difficult to find the switching point where the superior concept is changed. This sometimes makes the designer conservative and leads to the selection of a concept with too high a penalty. There is also a risk for the opposite and perhaps worse scenario: That the designer strives to reduce weight and cost and therefore, accidentally, chooses an under achieving concept and thus induces large downstream cost if late redesign or retro modifications are necessary.

This paper shows how optimization has been successfully used at Saab Aerospace as a tool that supports concept selection. The example shown is the choice of fuel transfer method for a ventral drop tank. The example also illustrates the impact of top-level requirements on low-level practicalities such as fuel system design.

Series
SAE Technical Paper
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12988 (URN)10.4271/2003-01-3054 (DOI)
Conference
SAE World Aviation Congress and Display, WAC 03, September 8-12, Montreal, Canada
Available from: 2008-04-01 Created: 2008-04-01 Last updated: 2014-01-21Bibliographically approved
3. Quantification of the Elements in the Relationship matrix: A conceptual study of Aircraft Fuel System
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantification of the Elements in the Relationship matrix: A conceptual study of Aircraft Fuel System
2004 (English)In: 42nd AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Reno, USA, paper AIAA-2004-0538, 2004, no AIAA-2004-0538, 5244-5252 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper describes how the framework of thc house of quality and design structure matrices are used to visualizee dependencies between top level requirements and engineering design properties. It is also discussed how quantification of the matrix elements may increase the understanding of how the top-level requirements impacts the low-level design parameters. lndeed, history has shown that overlooking combinatory effects between subsystems and night conditions may become expensive. Not only in terms of not goning getting the sizing right but more so if an entirely wrong concept is chosen.

This paper shows a matrix technique that has successfully been used at Saab and how this technique may facilitate the cconcept evaluation process of early fuel system design.

The matrix method aids the designer to take alk the relevant aspects into account when evaluating a design. Use of the method will also increase the understanding of what top-level requirement or combination thereof, which drives the choice of one particular concept rather than the other. The understanding of how the top-level requiremEnts impacts low level design parameters such as pump size or pipe diameter will also increse.

National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12984 (URN)10.2514/6.2004-538 (DOI)
Conference
42nd AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, 5-8 Januari, Reno, USA
Available from: 2008-04-01 Created: 2008-04-01 Last updated: 2014-01-21Bibliographically approved
4. Strategy for Modeling of large A/C fluid systems
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strategy for Modeling of large A/C fluid systems
Show others...
2004 (English)In: World Aviation Congress and Display, WAC-04, SAE Technical Paper 2004-01-3093, 2004, 1495-1506 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There is an ongoing trend in the European Military a/c industry towards cooperation between nations when purchasing and between manufacturers when developing and producing a/c. Different manufacturers at different locations develop different parts or sub-systems. When using this approach a vital part of a fast and precise system evaluation is the use of simulation models. In order to stay competitive it is not only sufficient to be able to build large simulation models but also to do it fast.

This paper describes the conclusions regarding a modelling strategy of large fluid systems drawn from the building of a simulation model of the JAS 39 Gripen fuel system. An overall process is suggested into which the activities of building a model are fitted. This is however not the main objective; it is more important to identify the different issues and activities at the engineering level. If these are properly dealt with, the model development time will be reduced, if not, the wrong model may be designed. "Wrong" here means a model that does not do the job, or solves a problem other than the one intended by the stakeholder.

Series
SAE technical paper series, ISSN 0148-7191 ; 3093
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12981 (URN)10.4271/2004-01-3093 (DOI)
Conference
World Aviation Congress and Display, WAC-04, Reno, USA
Available from: 2008-04-01 Created: 2008-04-01 Last updated: 2014-01-21Bibliographically approved

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