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Fears, hyperacusis and musicality in Williams syndrome
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0202-4650
Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4753-6745
2006 (English)In: Journal of Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 27, no 6, 668-680 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study investigated the prevalence of fear and hyperacusis and the possible connections between fear, hyperacusis and musicality in a Swedish sample of individuals with Williams syndrome (WS). The study included 38 individuals and a cross-sectional design, with no matched control group. Two persons, who knew the participant well, completed a questionnaire. On reported fears, 58% of the participants scored higher than +2S.D., compared to a psychometric study. Thirteen percent scored above the suggested cut-off for hyperacusis, compared to 2.5% in a psychometric study. Female participants generally had higher reported fears and hyperacusis compared to male participants. There were also startling findings of correlations between reported fears and hyperacusis. This preliminary report supports a hypothesis that fears and anxiety could be associated with hyperacusis in the WS population. A hypothesis that musicality could serve as a protective factor and prevent anxiety, received no or very limited support. A hypothesis that hyperacusis could be connected to a general, readily arousal, tendency in the sympathetic nervous system and could be seen as vulnerability for psychopathology is discussed. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 27, no 6, 668-680 p.
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Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-38200DOI: 10.1016/j.ridd.2005.09.002Local ID: 42569OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-38200DiVA: diva2:259049
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2015-09-22

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Rosander, MichaelAndersson, Gerhard

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