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The impact of the product mix on the value of flexibility
Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Production Economics.
Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Production Economics.
2002 (English)In: Omega, ISSN 0030-2228, Vol. 30, no 4, 265-273 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Product-mix flexibility is one of the major types of manufacturing flexibility, referring to the ability to produce a broad range of products or variants with presumed low changeover costs. The value of such a capability is important to establish for an industrial firm in order to ensure that the flexibility provided will be at the right level and used profitably rather than in excess of market requirements and consequently costly. We use option-pricing theory to analyse the impact of various product-mix issues on the value of flexibility. The real options model we use incorporates multiple products, capacity constraints as well as set-up costs. The issues treated here include the number of products, demand variability, correlation between products, and the relative demand distribution within the product mix. Thus, we are interested in the nature of the input data to analyse its effect on the value of flexibility. We also check the impact at different capacity levels. The results suggest that the value of flexibility (i) increases with an increasing number of products, (ii) decreases with increasing volatility of product demand, (iii) decreases the more positively correlated the demand is, and (iv) reduces for marginal capacity with increasing levels of capacity. Of these, the impact of positively correlated demand seems to be a major issue. However, the joint impact of the number of products and demand correlation showed some non-intuitive results. ⌐ 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 30, no 4, 265-273 p.
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Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-40200DOI: 10.1016/S0305-0483(02)00034-8Local ID: 52603OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-40200DiVA: diva2:261049
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2011-01-13

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Bengtsson, JensOlhager, Jan

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  • apa
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  • de-DE
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