LiU Electronic Press
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Author:
Gustafsson, Joakim (Linköping University, The Institute of Technology) (Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, KPLAB - Knowledge Processing Lab)
Doherty, Patrick (Linköping University, The Institute of Technology) (Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, KPLAB - Knowledge Processing Lab)
Title:
Embracing occlusion in specifying the indirect effects of actions
Department:
Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, KPLAB - Knowledge Processing Lab
Linköping University, The Institute of Technology
Publication type:
Conference paper (Refereed)
Language:
English
In:
Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Principles of Knowledge Representation and Reasoning
Editor:
Luigia Carlucci Aiello, Jon Doyle, Stuart C. Shapiro
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Pages:
87-98
Year of publ.:
1996
URI:
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-41455
Permanent link:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-41455
ISBN:
1-55860-421-9
Local ID:
56693
Subject category:
Computer Science
SVEP category:
Computer science
Abstract(en) :

In this paper, we extend PMON, a logic for reasoning about action and change, with causal rules which are used to specify the indirect effects of actions The extension, called PMON(RCs), has the advantage of using explicit time, includes actions with durations, nondeterministic actions, allows partial specification of the timing and order of actions and has been assessed correct for at least the K-IA class of action scenarios within the Features and Fluents framework Most importantly, the circumscription policy used is easily shown to be reducible to the firstorder case which insures that standard theorem proving techniques and their optimizations may be used to compute entailment In addition, we show how the occlusion concept previously used to deal with duration and nondeterministic actions proves to be equally versatile in representing causal constraints and delayed effects of actions We also discuss related work and consider the strong correspondence between our work and recent work by Lin, who uses a Cause predicate to specify indirect effects similar to our use of Occlude in PMON, and a minimization policy related to that used in PMON.

Available from:
2009-10-10
Created:
2009-10-10
Last updated:
2011-02-23
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