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Predisposing factors for bacterial vaginosis, treatment efficacy and pregnancy outcome among term deliveries, results from a preterm delivery study
Avd för Obstretik och Gynekologi Kärnsjukhuset, Skövde.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology.
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2007 (English)In: BMC Women's Health, ISSN 1472-6874, E-ISSN 1472-6874, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Bacterial vaginosis (BV) during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery but little is known about factors that could predict BV. We have analyzed if it is possible to identify a category of pregnant women that should be screened for BV, and if BV would alter the pregnancy outcome at term, we have also studied the treatment efficacy of clindamycin. Methods: Prospective BV screening and treatment study of 9025 women in a geographically defined region in southeast Sweden. BV was defined as a modified Nugent score of 6 and above. Data was collected from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Women allocated to treatment were supplied with vaginal clindamycin cream. The main outcome goals were to identify factors that could predict BV. Results: Vaginal smears were consistent with BV criteria in 9.3%. Logistic regression indicates a significant correlation between smoking and BV (p < 0.001) and a greater prevalence of BV in the lower age groups (p < 0.001). We found no correlation between BV and history of preterm deliveries, previous miscarriages, extra-uterine pregnancies, infertility problems or reported history of urinary tract infections-factors that earlier have been associated with BV. Treatment with clindamycin cream showed a cure rate of 77%. Less than 1% of women with a normal vaginal smear in early pregnancy will develop BV during the pregnancy. There was no association between BV and the obstetric outcome among women who delivered at term. Women with BV, both treated patients and nontreated, had the same obstetric outcome at term as women with normal vaginal flora. Conclusion: BV is more than twice as common among smokers, and there is a higher prevalence in the younger age group. However these two markers for BV do not suffice as a tool for screening, and considering the lack of other risk factors associated with BV, screening of all pregnant women might be a strategy to follow in a program intended to reduce the number of preterm births. © 2007 Larsson et al, licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 7
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Medical and Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-41813DOI: 10.1186/1472-6874-7-20Local ID: 59137OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-41813DiVA, id: diva2:262668
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13

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Fåhraeus, LarsCarlsson, BodilJakobsson, TellForsum, Urban

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Faculty of Health SciencesObstetrics and gynecologyDepartment of Gynecology and Obstetrics in LinköpingClinical MicrobiologyDepartment of Clinical Microbiology
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BMC Women's Health
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